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Today I will be answering the
following questions:
·What is prohibition and why
was it introduced in 1919?
·What was a `speakeasy'?
·Who was Al Capone and
why did he have so much
power in 1920's Chicago?
·What were the effects of the
`crime boom' on American
society?…read more

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On the 16th of January, 1920,
the volstead act made
prohibition a national law. The
Volstead act was written by
Andrew J. Volstead
Prohibition was a law,
banning the manufacture and
distribution of alcohol.
All beverages with a higher
alcoholic content than 0.5%
were abolished from
manufacture or sale.
Although it was passed into
This was passed because of a widespread 16th, two
fear of an
law on January
alcoholic republic; it was believed thirds
that the
ofProhibition would
the state had already
deter alcoholism. This was mostly `gone
pushed into effect by
dry'.
women's unions and religious groups…read more

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A speakeasy
A speakeasy was a nightclub
that illegally sold, bought and
allowed people to drink inside
them. Speakeasies gave easy
work to musicians who
couldn't find work elsewhere.
By 1925 there were over
100000 speakeasies in New
York alone.
The name speakeasy comes
from a customer ordering a
drink and the bartender telling
the customer to be quiet and
speakeasy.…read more

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