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The rate at which electrically charged particles (electrons) pass through a point in a
circuit. Flows from negative to positive terminals
The electrical energy transferred per unit of charge passing through the points
The opposition to the flow of charge.
Potential Difference, Current and Resistance can all be linked by equation
When the current in a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference
across it, providing other conditions such as temperature stay the same…read more

Slide 3

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This circuit can be used to take current
and voltage readings for different
components placed at ( X ).
Remember, to obtain negative
readings, the component or battery
must be reversed.
The variable resistor is inserted into
the circuit so the more than one
reading can be taken. V…read more

Slide 4

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The current and voltage are
Current / A
directly proportional (obeys
Ohms Law).
It doesn't matter which way
round the resistor is.
The steeper the line, the lower
the resistance.
Voltage / V
(If the Current and Voltage axes
are the other way around, a
steep line will mean a bigger
resistance)…read more

Slide 5

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Filament Lamp
The graph is symmetrical,
Current / A
showing it doesn't matter which
way round the bulb is.
Voltage and Current do not
increase proportionally.
As current increases, the wire
gets hot and its resistance
increases. This means the graph Voltage / V
becomes less steep.
The rate of increase of current
decreases with an increase in
voltage.…read more

Slide 6

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When the diode is FORWARD
Current / A
BIASED, there is a big resistance
for the current when voltage is
between 0 - 0.7V
Between 0.7 ­ 1V, the resistance
is very low and the diode
conducts. A large current flows.
Voltage / V
When the diode is REVERSE
BIASED, it has a very high
resistance and no current flows
until the breakdown voltage
around 50 ­ 500V.…read more

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