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"Philip Larkin has thought to have shown a perceptive awareness in his
poems and Pam Ayres is said to be witty and perceptive." To what extent do
you think this is accurate of their understanding of love and marriage?

Philip Larkin and Pam Ayres are two great poets who have…

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grace". The word "commissioned" suggests that the artist was paid to show a
different version of what a couple is meant to be like in society, which is romantic
and being together forever, rather than what is beneath the surface. What one can
notice from Larkin's perception towards love and…

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possession just like the "old list, old programmes" and that they are no longer
remembered, just an object of the past. Larkin is thought to be a very pessimistic
poet but sometimes readers may mistake his realism to be cynicism, because of the
way he describes marriage, which is shown…

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The final poem of Philip Larkin is "Talking In Bed", which talks about a husband
and wife living together, yet being completely alone; and not being able to find the
words that were once there, or knowing that the words that were once there never
had true meaning. From this…

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"Silver Wedding Speech" is a humorous poem based on the theme of
marriage. It focuses on a woman who leaves a twenty-five year old marriage to chase
her freedom rather than willingly commit and sacrifice her life for the sake of the
marriage. The first verse of the poem focuses…

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I feel that both poets are perceptive and have an accurate about the
understanding of love and marriage. Larkin's poems of "An Arundel Tomb", and
"Talking in Bed" is more realistic and accurate because without love and affection
between the two partners, most relationships are more likely to breakdown
nowadays.…

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