P7 (Physics) IDEAS IN CONTEXT, May 2012, GCSE

This is information that I expect will come up and we will need for the Ideas and Context in Physics P7May 2012. I cannot guarantee that I have included all the information needed, or that the information listed below will be needed, but it will help with your general knowledge anyway. Good luck!

I haven't had a chance to proof read it, but I hope it makes sense! Keep a look out incase I choose to update it- I might not, but I'll mention below if I have.

 

 

Credit to CGP revision guide and BBC Bitesize for some of the information

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Stephanie Smith Sources- CGP Revision Guide, BBC Bitesize and own knowledge
P7 Ideas In Context May 2012
This is information that I expect will come up and we will need for the Ideas and Context in
Physics P7May 2012. I cannot guarantee that I have included all the information needed, or
that the information listed below will be needed, but it will help with your general knowledge
anyway. Good luck!
Hypotheses:
· A hypothesis is an explanation/theory, created using information scientists already know and the
information gathered in research.
· "It is a theory needing investigation"
· Hypotheses are used by scientists to make a prediction, which can be tested to provide further
evidence to support the explanation/ hypothesis.
· A hypothesis may not be true.
· After coming up with the hypothesis, the next step is to try and find evidence to support it. There
are many different types of evidence:
· The results that are gathered from controlled experiments, made within laboratories,
where scientists are able to control variables so that they're all kept constant, with the
exception of the thing that you are testing. This makes it easier to carry out a fair test
· Data can be collected from studies or from observations
· Scientists can observe existing data from previous experiments to test an hypothesis
· The next step is for other scientists to test the hypothesis:
· The scientist who came up with the hypothesis will report what they have found out by
publishing their findings to other scientists. For example, they may do this through a
scientific journal.
· Other scientists will then use the evidence to make their own predictions and also carry
out their own experiments.
· While doing this, they will try to reproduce the results made by the first scientist.
· If all of the experiments back up the hypothesis, scientists will begin to have a lot of faith
in it, and so accept it as a theory.
· If, however, a scientist gets results that don't fit with the hypothesis, either their results
are wrong, or the hypothesis must be wrong.
· Theories that are currently accepted have been tested many, many times, and got the same
results.
Reliability:
"Data can be reproduced by others in independent studies"
Accuracy of measurements:

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Stephanie Smith Sources- CGP Revision Guide, BBC Bitesize and own knowledge
You won't always get the same result when you take lots of measurements of
something:
o This could be because you are measuring independent things, such as the
size of people's feet
o However, it could be because the thing that you are measuring isn't always
the same such as the temperature
o Or, perhaps the thing i.e. the subject stays the same, but your measurement
of it changes.…read more

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Stephanie Smith Sources- CGP Revision Guide, BBC Bitesize and own knowledge
If they land in an ocean, huge tsunamis can be caused, and once these reach land, they can
cause huge fires, and also hurl lots of hot rocks as well as dust into the air
As mentioned in the article, the dust and smoke from a large impact is able to block out
sunlight for many months, causing climate change, and can potentially lead to the extinction
of species
Craters can be created (i.e.…read more

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Stephanie Smith Sources- CGP Revision Guide, BBC Bitesize and own knowledge
Examples of probability:
What's the probability of a 2500m in diameter asteroid colliding with Earth this year?
The answer is 1/(0.6x1000000)=1/600,000= 0.00017% chance
An asteroid collided with Earth last year, with a diameter of 2500m. What's the chance of another
asteroid of this diameter colliding with the Earth in five years time?
The answer would still be 0.00017%.…read more

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