OCR A2 History English Government & Church 1066-1216 - Archbishop Podcasts Transcript

OCR A2 History English Government & Church 1066-1216.

Transcript of the Podcasts on the following archbishops: Lanfranc, Anselm, Ralph d'Escures, Theobald, Thomas Becket, Hubert Walter, Stephen Langton.

All podcasts available on Get Revising.

Sources: Ruling England by Richard Huscroft, Articles on BBC History by Dr. Mike Ibeji, class notes, http://collegehistory.wordpress.com/england-1066-1216-a2/. No copyright infringement intended.

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Lechiayim
  • Created on: 29-05-13 13:16
Preview of OCR A2 History English Government & Church 1066-1216 - Archbishop Podcasts Transcript

First 393 words of the document:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
The Church ­ Podcast Transcript
Lanfranc
Hello, and welcome to this OCR A2 History Revision Podcast on the English
Government & Church 10661216 by me, Sacha Moore. This podcast will
discuss Lanfranc, his aims in terms of church reform, his relations with the King
and the Pope, and the impact he had on the primacy debate.
Consecrated on 29th August 1070, Lanfranc was a well educated and widely
respected churchman. Having previously been the Prior of the Abbey at Bec and
later the Abbot of St. Stephen's in Caen, Lanfranc was a close personal friend of
William I. They shared similar ideologies, particularly concerning the reforms of
the church, yet although many similarities can be drawn with their church reforms
and those being presented by Pope Gregory VII, Lanfranc (arguably at the
orders of William) publicly shunned the Pope throughout his archiepiscopate.
Examples of church reform can be seen predominantly at the beginning of
William's reign, in which Lanfranc's aim of removing abuses and tightening
control is evident the First Synod of Winchester in 1070, the Council of London
in 1075 and the Council of Winchester in 1076 all threatened to sack married
churchmen, attacked simony (the selling of church posts) and condemned
pluralism (the holding of multiple positions). However, despite the similarities
with the Gregorian reforms, William refused to involve the Papacy as much as
Pope Gregory wanted. Evidence for this includes William's censoring of all
letters to English Bishops from 1073 onwards, Lanfranc's refusal of Gregory's
summons to Rome in 1079 and William's rebuttal in his letter to the Pope in
1080 in which he declines to pay fealty to Gregory. Furthermore, Bishops were
not allowed to visit Rome without expressed Royal consent, nor were appeals to
Rome allowed without the King's direct authorisation. The reason for this tight
control is almost certainly down to power Gregory wanted to increase his control
over the English Church, whereas William needed to assert his authority over his
newlyconquered kingdom and establish his legitimacy and used the church's
power as one method of achieving this and it was this conflict of interest that led
1

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
to division. Lanfranc's close alignment with William therefore meant poor
relations between Archbishop and Pope.
Under William and Lanfranc, Canon Law was also widely developed. On
Lanfranc's request, William empowered the first church courts and prevented lay
judges from interfering in spiritual cases in 1072.…read more

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
Anselm remained Archbishop (on and off) until his death in 1109 Frank Barlow's
metaphor that "the Pastoral Staff was thrust into Anselm's clenched fist " goes
some way to highlight Anselm's unwillingness to take up the duties of his role.
From the very beginning there was a lot of friction between King and Archbishop,
as Rufus refused to recognise any of the three terms of acceptance that Anselm
presented him with before he was invested as Archbishop.…read more

Page 4

Preview of page 4

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
Anselm's relationship with the Pope, on the other hand, was far stronger for the
majority of his archiepiscopate than his relations with the King, and this was
largely due to his sympathy and support with the ideals of the Papal Reform
movement (perhaps largely as a result of him being more of a monk than a
politician).…read more

Page 5

Preview of page 5

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
allowed to preside over a reforming council) went some way to improving the
relationship between Archbishop and King and strengthen the English church
whilst causing a decline in the relations between Archbishop and Pope.
The main effect of Ralph's archiepiscopate, however, was on the issue of
primacy. Ralph refused to consecrate Thurstan as Archbishop of York in 1114
unless he received a written profession of obedience unsurprisingly, Thurstan
refused.…read more

Page 6

Preview of page 6

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
those of Theobald. On his return from Rome, Theobald swore an oath of fealty to
Stephen, showing good relations between King and Archbishop. This was,
however, to be the high point of the relationship between the two Theobald was
a keen advocate of Canon Law, whilst Stephen aimed to hold on to as much
legal authority as possible.…read more

Page 7

Preview of page 7

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
arguably managed to strengthen the position of the church in England by his
extension of Canon Law. His exertion of primatial authority goes further to
highlight that much developed in the archiepiscopate of Theobald.
Becket
Hello, and welcome to this OCR A2 History Revision Podcast on the English
Government & Church 10661216 by me, Sacha Moore. This podcast will
discuss St.…read more

Page 8

Preview of page 8

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
throwaway comment "will noone rid me of this troublesome priest?", four
knights travelled to Canterbury and murdered Becket.
Although Becket did achieve some things in terms of strengthening the English
church during his lifetime, most notably in his stand against the Constitution of
Clarendon, it is certainly credible to suggest that Becket achieved more in his
death than he did in life.…read more

Page 9

Preview of page 9

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
would be in 1200 when he held a reforming council in London, where he put
forward 14 new church laws which related to both financial affairs and the duties
of clergymen. Walter also acted as a mediator between the King and the order of
Cistercian monks in a dispute that broke out in John's reign.…read more

Page 10

Preview of page 10

Here's a taster:

Sacha Moore A2 History Revision 5th May 2013
as a traitor. John also exiled the monks at Canterbury, and in response, the
Pope put England under a Papal interdict in 1207 and excommunicated John in
1209. Although this might sound very serious, the interdict did, in many ways,
suite John he gained a very large amount of revenue from vacant posts.
However, in 1212, John realised that he needed the support of the Pope against
a suspected war with Philip of France.…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all resources »