Neural/Biological Explanations For Eating Behaviour

8 AO1s and 16 AO2s. A* essay. Set out in table for easy memorising.

Good Luck! :)

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Andrew F.
  • Created on: 21-06-12 19:15
Preview of Neural/Biological Explanations For Eating Behaviour

First 404 words of the document:

Neural/Biological Explanations For Eating Behaviour ­ Andrew F
AO1's AO2's
1 Biological explanations of eating
behaviour proposes that the control of
eating is based on seven nutrients, three
of which are macronutrients
carbohydrates, proteins and fats.
Controlling these nutrients ensures the
maintenance of the internal environment.
This is homeostasis.
2 Recent research suggests that the
hormones insulin and glucagon play a
large part in eating behaviours. The
biological approach states that food intake
causes a rise in glucose levels, causing
the pancreas to make insulin, which
causes the liver to store the glucose as
glycogen. When there is a lack of food
intake, glucose levels fall, causing the
pancreas to make glucagon, which causes
the liver to convert stored glycogen to
glucose. This cycle keeps glucose levels
balanced.
N/A This cycle is controlled by the two areas of 1 Hetherington and Ranson support this
the hypothalamus called the lateral biological model. They studied the link
hypothalamus and the ventromedial between the hypothalamus and eating
hypothalamus. behaviour. They lesioned the ventromedial
hypothalamus in rats. This caused the rats to
eat more and become obese. They
concluded that the ventromedial
hypothalamus is responsible for satiety.
2 However this research is limited because
the hypothalamus is such a small part of the
brain and therefore it is hard to say that the
only part of the brain they damaged was the
ventromedial hypothalamus.
3 Also, rats cannot be compared to humans
as humans are much more evolved and
have higher cognitive abilities than rats.
4 Also, the experiment poses ethical issues
regarding animal rights. Some would argue
that it is unethical to irreversibly damage
parts of a rat's brain especially when
causing detrimental effects.
5 Anand and Brobeck add to the work by
Hetherington and Ranson. They lesioned the
lateral hypothalamus. The rats then became
aphagic.
3 These experiments led to Stellar 6 However other research has suggested that
proposing the dual control theory. Stellar this explanation is too simple and that there
concluded that the ventromedial and are other factors that need to be included.
lateral hypothalamus were part of the For example, dual control theory states that

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

Neural/Biological Explanations For Eating Behaviour ­ Andrew F
homeostatic loop to control feeding. The the only triggers for eating behaviour are
dual control theory states that after food hunger or satiety and does not include other
intake, the ventromedial area causes triggers.
satiety and when there is a lack of food
intake, the lateral area causes hunger.
4 There are many other triggers which can
turn on the lateral area. One of which is the
sight or smell of adaptive foods.…read more

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Here's a taster:

Neural/Biological Explanations For Eating Behaviour ­ Andrew F
found that when the ventromedial
hypothalamus was removed, rats became
obese. However, after force feeding the rats
to become even fatter, then allowing them
choose their own diet, they thinned
themselves down to their previous, but still
obese, weight.
15 This shows that the dual control theory is
reductionist as it is not just about the lateral
being turned on when empty and the
ventromedial being turned on when full.…read more

Comments

Yasmin

ANYMO0RE FOR EVOLUTIONARY EXPLANATIONS? DID U DO SCHIZPHRENIA, RELATIONSHIPS, BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS AND MEDIA TOO? I KNOW U DIDNT MAKE THESE AS I FOUND ONE OF THEM ONLINE IN MORE DETAIL, WHERE DID U GET THEM FROM? THANKS (BTW MY CAPS IS BROKEN IM NOT YELLING).

Andrew F.

I did make these, anything you found online has taken mine and elaborated. I used my teacher's materials and the Collins A2 Psychology text book.

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all resources »