Indus River Flood (Pakistan) Case Study

Going over some of the points and key parts of the Pakistan Flooding in 2010

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  • Created on: 09-02-13 15:17
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RESEARCH ­ INDUS RIVER FLOODING, PAKISTAN, 2010
CAUSES
The floods were predominantly driven by the intense, and
prolonged monsoon rains, which characterise a lot of the climates
found in the Middle East. On the 21st of June 2010, the Pakistan
Meteorological Department (PMD) warned that flash flooding was
imminent in the northern parts of the country.
In that same month, the monsoon rainfall was in excess of 87%,
and was the highest since 1994.
In addition to this, the PMD reported that over 200 millimetres of
rain had fallen over a 24-hour period in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and
Punjab. Moreover, a record breaking 274 millimetres of rain fell in
Peshawar during that same 24-hour period.
IMPACTS
- There were over 1500 fatalities
- Nearly 3000 people were injured
- 20 million people were affected in over 11000 villages, which seemed to be
almost entirely isolated from help
- £1.5 billion in agricultural loss, as the river flooding expanded at one point to
over 40km wide. In addition to this, crops were ruined, some livestock drowned,
and food reserves were spoiled, creating food shortages that manifested to
hunger and more malnutrition. Food aid was donated by the United Nations
- 1.9 million houses were damaged in the process

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In fact, entire villages were submerged resulting in more than a million people
displaced in their homes
- Poor sanitation and little medicine (if even food) available meaning that there
is a real spread of disease epidemics
- Infrastructure was demolished ­ temporary structures such as rope bridges
were constructed in the aftermath…read more

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Human Impacts: - There were over 1500 fatalities
- Nearly 3000 people were injured
- 20 million people were affected in over 11000 villages, which seemed to be
almost entirely isolated from help
- £1.5 billion in agricultural loss, as the river flooding expanded at one point to
over 40km wide. In addition to this, crops were ruined, some livestock drowned,
and food reserves were spoiled, creating food shortages that manifested to
hunger and more malnutrition.…read more

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