Hour

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  • Created on: 23-05-12 08:52
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Hour Point Example Effect
Shakespearean Shows it is about love in the traditional sense.
F
sonnet Shakespearean sonnets are usually about love. It is laid out as 14 lines divided into 3 quatrains and an end rhyming couplet. It also follows the rhyme
scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet; every other line
Romantic `we kiss', 'your hair like The use of romantic language creates a passionate poem. The poet is constantly praising their partner and with the use of the personal pronoun `we', the
L
Fairy-tale treasured ground'. reader is given an image of unity between them, showing that this love is not only requited but they enjoy to be in one another's company.
Caesura `jewel' `cuckoo spit', ` There is a contrast between images traditionally seen as romantic (or associated with wealth) and the ordinary: "Flowers" and "grass ditch" compare to
Enjambment sunlight', `chandelier'
a "jewel" and "cuckoo spit" (insect eggs left on long grass); "sunlight" contrasts with a "chandelier"; "gold" contrasts with "straw". These contrasts
Pivotal word `gold' `straw'
Repetition `gold from straw', `Midas emphasise the romance of the lovers' time together. Traditional ideas are shown to be unimportant compared to the personal experience of the two
light' characters.
`Now' The use of using fairy tales in this poem such as Rumplestiltzskin shows that their love will end happily, as all fairy tales have a `happily ever after'. The
`the Midas light turning use of `Midas light' turning the speaker's partner to gold suggests that the moments spent together are as valuable and perhaps more valuable than
your limbs to gold.' gold. It also shows the poet being romantic as she is exaggerating her lover's physical features and praising them by describing them as valuable as
`but' gold.
`gold'
In the final stanza there is a single-word sentence "Now.". It is simple, like the lovers' situation, and yet has a strong sense of being complete; nothing
more is needed. It celebrates the moment rather than dwelling on the future or the past.
Enjambment gives the effect of the light spreading which could suggest that their love becomes more valuable by the second, especially with the theme
of the poem being that love is controlled by time. The enjambment is used throughout to show the continuity. It is interrupted though with caesura
which gives the impression of the fight between love and time.
The pivotal word `but' is used frequently. Firstly it is used to show that their love is not materialistic or follows the traditional form of buying lowers and
gifts, but instead their time spent together is more than enough and worth more than materialistic items such as flowers.
The repetition of the word `gold', whether echoing the theme of wealth or beauty or light, suggests that love creates the very best life has to offer and
what they have is more powerful and valuable than anything else.
Money/wealth `spend it not on flowers', By comparing their love to wealth, they are showing that their love is priceless and cannot be valued. It also suggests that they could live off of their love
I
Love and time ­ `we are millionaires' if they were poor, as they don't need money to survive as long as they have one another. The word `spend' in the quote `spend it not on flowers' can be
Juxtaposed `treasure' `gold' interpreted in 2 ways; firstly to mean the literal meaning of spending money or as a metaphor for choosing quality time- `the whole of the summer sky
Personification `thousands of seconds',
and a grass ditch'. The idea of a ditch at the end of the stanza is unexpected, but makes it more realistic and down-to earth, in contrast to the romantic
Light `millionaires
backhanding the night' presents of wine and flowers.
`Love's time's beggar' Stanza 2 begins by juxtaposing `thousands of seconds', an unusual way of saying that they stretch the time they have and make each second count.
`candle', `chandelier' `Millionaires backhanding the night' continues the money theme, suggesting that lovers slip extra payments to night (a personified time-lender) to
`light' `shining' bribe him to wait so that `Time slows'.
By personifying love as time's beggar, she is showing how love is always asking for more time to enjoy being with the one you love. With the simile
`bright as a dropped coin' she compares `a single hour' to a coin that dropped on the ground in front of a beggar, `makes love rich'.
Frequent references to images of light in contrast to the night and the darkness of inevitable separation. These include: "Bright", "summer sky", "Midas
light", "shining hour", "candle", "chandelier or spotlight". Duffy uses light to suggest a positive, warm, optimistic liaison. Rather than dwelling on the
darkness of separation the lovers make the most of the time they have together.

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Alternate rhyme and Sonnets often use a final rhyming couplet to offer a 'turn' in the meaning; however, Duffy only offers a partial turn, which is confirmation of the idea
R
couplet at end that love will always triumph by finding unlikely sources of value. The constant rhyming scheme could also suggest the continuity of their love for one
NOT IAMBIC another.
PENTAMETER
Only lines 6 and 9 conform to the iambic pentameter that comes with a Shakespearean sonnet.…read more

Comments

Ferarri Lexus

thanks!!!

Mohammed abdi

Hour

Point

Example

Effect

F

Shakespearean sonnet

·  Shows it is about love in the traditional sense.

·  Shakespearean sonnets are usually about love. It is laid out as 14 lines divided into 3 quatrains and an end rhyming couplet. It also follows the rhyme scheme of a Shakespearean sonnet; every other line

L

Romantic

Fairy-tale

Caesura

Enjambment

Pivotal word

Repetition

‘we kiss’, ’your hair like treasured ground’. ‘jewel’ ‘cuckoo spit’, ‘ sunlight’, ‘chandelier’ ‘gold’ ‘straw’

‘gold from straw’, ‘Midas light’

‘Now’

‘the Midas light turning your limbs to gold.’

‘but’

‘gold’

·  The use of romantic language creates a passionate poem. The poet is constantly praising their partner and with the use of the personal pronoun ‘we’, the reader is given an image of unity between them, showing that this love is not only requited but they enjoy to be in one another’s company.

·  There is a contrast between images traditionally seen asromantic(or associated with wealth) and theordinary:"Flowers"and"grass ditch"compare to a"jewel"and "cuckoo spit"(insect eggs left on long grass);"sunlight"contrasts with a"chandelier"; "gold"contrasts with"straw". These contrasts emphasise the romance of the lovers' time together. Traditional ideas are shown to be unimportant compared to the personal experience of the two characters.

·  The use of using fairy tales in this poem such as Rumplestiltzskin shows that their love will end happily, as all fairy tales have a ‘happily ever after’. The use of ‘Midas light’ turning the speaker’s partner to gold suggests that the moments spent together are as valuable and perhaps more valuable than gold. It also shows the poet being romantic as she is exaggerating her lover’s physical features and praising them by describing them as valuable as gold.

·  In the final stanza there is a single-word sentence"Now.". It is simple, like the lovers' situation, and yet has a strong sense of being complete; nothing more is needed. It celebrates the moment rather than dwelling on the future or the past.

·  Enjambment gives the effect of the light spreading which could suggest that their love becomes more valuable by the second, especially with the theme of the poem being that love is controlled by time. The enjambment is used throughout to show the continuity. It is interrupted though with caesura which gives the impression of the fight between love and time.

·  The pivotal word ‘but’ is used frequently. Firstly it is used to show that their love is not materialistic or follows the traditional form of buying lowers and gifts, but instead their time spent together is more than enough and worth more than materialistic items such as flowers.

·  The repetition of the word ‘gold’, whether echoing the theme of wealth or beauty  or light, suggests that love creates the very best life has to offer and what they have is more powerful and valuable than anything else.

I

Money/wealth

Love and time – Juxtaposed

Personification

Light

‘spend it not on flowers’, ‘we are millionaires’ ‘treasure’ ‘gold’

‘thousands of seconds’, ‘millionaires backhanding the night’

‘Love’s time’s beggar’

candle’, ‘chandelier’ ‘light’ ‘shining’

·  By comparing their love to wealth, they are showing that their love is priceless and cannot be valued. It also suggests that they could live off of their love if they were poor, as they don’t need money to survive as long as they have one another. The word ‘spend’ in the quote ‘spend it not on flowers’ can be interpreted in 2 ways; firstly to mean the literal meaning of spending money or as a metaphor for choosing quality time- ‘the whole of the summer sky and a grass ditch’. The idea of a ditch at the end of the stanza is unexpected, but makes it more realistic and down-to earth, in contrast to the romantic presents of wine and flowers.

·  Stanza 2 begins by juxtaposing ‘thousands of seconds’, an unusual way of saying that they stretch the time they have and make each second count. ‘Millionaires backhanding the night’ continues the money theme, suggesting that lovers slip extra payments to night (a personified time-lender) to bribe him to wait so that ‘Time slows’.

·  By personifying love as time’s beggar, she is showing how love is always asking for more time to enjoy being with the one you love. With the simile ‘bright as a dropped coin’ she compares ‘a single hour’ to a coin that dropped on the ground in front of a beggar, ‘makes love rich’.

·  Frequent references toimages of lightin contrast to the night and the darkness of inevitable separation. These include:"Bright","summer sky","Midas light","shining hour","candle","chandelier or spotlight". Duffy uses light to suggest a positive, warm, optimistic liaison. Rather than dwelling on the darkness of separation the lovers make the most of the time they have together.

R

Alternate rhyme  and couplet at end

NOT IAMBIC PENTAMETER

·  Sonnets often use a final rhyming couplet to offer a 'turn' in the meaning; however, Duffy only offers a partial turn, which is confirmation of the idea thatlove will always triumphby finding unlikely sources of value. The constant rhyming scheme could also suggest the continuity of their love for one another.

·  Only lines 6 and 9 conform to the iambic pentameter that comes with a Shakespearean sonnet. It adds a particularly romantic mood to the experience in these lines.

T

Loving

Passionate

Romantic

Carpe diem

·  The loving and passionate tone has been created by the way she speaker has been showing how much more valuable love is compared to anything else in the world.

·  This poem also gives the impression of the message ‘Carpe diem’; seize the day, as the speaker knows that love cannot win against time and so they will try to spend as much time together as they can.


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