Ghazal Language Analysis - AQA Relationships Cluster

Notes based on Mr Bruff's videos and BBC Bitesize.

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Cara
  • Created on: 01-07-14 17:07
Preview of Ghazal Language Analysis - AQA Relationships Cluster

First 355 words of the document:

Language - Ghazal
Point Evidence Analysis
- Repetition - `If I am' - If = conditional word, seems wistful and
- `me' full of unfulfilled desire. Creates a
condition.
- Me = repetition in 1st and last stanza
portrays poets name `Mimi'. Implies
desperate to be noticed.
- Enjambment - `don't hang / on my lips' - Causes line to literally hang.
- `on my lips' comes as a surprise.
- Reflects her waiting for the cue.
- Imperative verbs - `woo me' - Entice the listener into the relationship.
- `subdue me' etc. - Rhyming words to fulfil rules of Ghazal
form.
- First person - `If I am' - Seems more personal.
- Alliteration, - `grass and you the - Suggest sound of wind blowing.
onomatopoeia, long breeze, blow through'
vowels
- Metaphor - `grass and you the - `grass': noun, fixed & constant,
breeze, blow through' something organic which depends on
water ­ like how she is depending on him.
­ Earth.
- `breeze': abstract noun, moving and
inconstant, comes and goes ­ Heaven.
- `blow': breath of God.
- Alliteration (and - `rhyme' and `refrain' - `r' creates a stronger link between the
metaphor) words, showing compatibility she hopes
for.
- `rhyme' is joined to another line.
- `refrain' is something the reader always
comes back to.
- Speaker = refrain, feels less important
and meaningful than loved one, or how her
feelings are always repeated and a key
feature.
- Euphemism - `come and I'll come too' - She is submissive, wants him to control
- `cue me' her.
- Erotic love, her desire to be with him, in
unity.
- `cue me' = power/direction from him ­ or
God's plan?
- Metaphor - `the arrow flies, the heart - Tattoos = permanent. Suggests love will
is pierced, tattoo me' remain constant.
- OR mark of God?
- Arrow = cupid?

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

­ unrequited love
hurts.
- Paired metaphors - `moth to my flame' - Suggests love between them is
- `hawk to my shadow' irresistible.
- `the rose and you the - Hawk = free, also a predator. `Shadow'
bird' stuck on ground, locked.
- Moth = winged creature, free to roam.
- Flame = dangerous, burned if pursues
her. Love can also be destructive.
- Rose pollinated by bird ­ can't have one
without the other. Enforces passion she
feels.…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all resources »