Gender Language

A guide to what gender language consists of, including examples and theorists. Suitable for As English Language.

HideShow resource information
Preview of Gender Language

First 282 words of the document:

GENDERED TALKING?
GENDER STEREOTYPES IN SPOKEN LANGUAGE
Women gossip
Men are strong and silent
Women talk about domestic and personal trivia
Men talk about important topics (business/money/government)
Women have soft and gentle voices ­ or loud, strident voices
Women screech whilst men have rich, deep reassuring tones conveying
confidence and authority
THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO GENDER AND SPOKEN LANGUAGE
Since 1970s ­ big focus on the effects of gender on language
Jennifer COATES (1993) identifies two approaches:
(1) Dominance
o Sees women as an oppressed group
o Interprets differences in women's and men's speech in terms of
men's dominance and women's subordination
o Researchers/theorists taking this view include:
Robin LAKOFF (1975)
Dale SPENDER (1980)
ZIMMERMAN & WEST (1983)
(2) Difference
o Sees women and men as belonging to `different sub-cultures'
o Differently socialised from childhood onwards
o May therefore have different problems in communication as adults
Deborah TANNEN (1989) takes this view
GENDER AND CASUAL CONVERSATION
Talking seems least affected by consciousness of gender difference, and
to be most relaxed
Characteristics of casual conversation include:
o Adjacency pairs
o Vague language
o Non-fluency features
o Topic and speaker shift
o Back-channel behaviour
o Politeness markers
o Overlaps
o Interruptions
Even silence in conversation can have a functions
o Refusal to participate can be a control strategy
o Could be an expression of disempowerment
GENDER, GRAMMAR AND LEXIS
Researchers have investigated men and women's use of spoken language in
casual conversations

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

Discovered evidence that men interrupt women even when women
are of higher status
o They hold the floor longer
o Take longer turns
o Tend to reject women's topic choice
Men:
o Use imperatives as directives
o Use stronger swear words
o Higher proportion of slang and colloquial lexis
o Use more hypotaxis (embedded structures) in sentences
Women:
o Use more parataxis (linked structures)
o Use more intensifiers
o More evaluative lexis
o More politeness markers
o Initiate exchanges more than me
o Use more…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language resources:

See all English Language resources »See all resources »