Frankenstein Quotes and Analysis

Useful quotes from Frankenstein and analysis of individual quotes with contextual quotations for criticism

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  • Created on: 08-12-14 23:54
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FRANKENSTEIN QUOTES
`Did I request thee, Maker, from clay
To mould me Man, did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?'
­ Adam
Where: Title page (quoted from Paradise Lost)
Theme: Unwilling genesis
Context: An extraction John Milton's `Paradise Lost', where Adam bemoans his fallen
condition. The creature conceives himself a tragic figure, comparable to Adam and Satan of
`Paradise Lost'. Like Adam, the creature has been shunned by his creator and must reproach
Frankenstein for his unfortunate genesis. These rhetorical questions epitomize the creature's
animosity towards Frankenstein, casting him into a world where he inspires horror and
hostility from mankind.
`What may not be expected in a country of eternal light?'
­ Walton
Where: Volume 1, Letter 1 (pg. 1)
Theme: Dangerous knowledge
Context: Light is a symbol for knowledge and discovery and Walton's quest to reach the
northernmost part of the world parallels Frankenstein and his quest for the secret of life.
Both seek ultimate knowledge through the abandonment of the known in their respective
pursuits. Walton's sentiment epitomizes 18th century scientific rationalists' optimism about
knowledge as a form of pure good.
`You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did and I ardently
hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to
sting you, as mine has been.'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 1, Letter 4
Theme: Dangerous knowledge
Context: Frankenstein expresses the tragic consequence of his obsessive pursuit for
knowledge. He acknowledges that he has transgressed the realm of the known and perverted
science for his own immoral human gain. Frankenstein knows that the quest for knowledge
can lead to self-destruction, having once possessed the hubris of Walton and his desire to
leap beyond the boundaries of man in anticipation for fame and recognition. The word
`serpent' has biblical connotations, inferring that Frankenstein has succumbed to the sinful
act of creation ­ an act in defiance of his role as a mortal human being.
`My more than sister, since till death she was to be mine only.'

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Frankenstein
Where: Volume 1, Letter 4
Theme: Dangerous knowledge
Context: Frankenstein expresses the tragic consequence of his obsessive pursuit for
knowledge. He acknowledges that he has transgressed the realm of the known and perverted
science for his own immoral human gain. Frankenstein knows that the quest for knowledge
can lead to self-destruction, having once possessed the hubris of Walton and his desire to
leap beyond the boundaries of man in anticipation for fame and recognition.…read more

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I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to
the world the deepest mysteries of creation'
­ Frankenstein
`Now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and
breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 1, Chapter 4 (p. 55)
Theme: Science, unchecked intellectual ambition
Context: Frankenstein reaches a moment of clarity, having previously been blinded by the
sole pursuit of creation.…read more

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Elizabeth's indictment of the judicial
system is reminiscent of Godwin's anarchistic denunciation of `positive institutions' like the
law and government as the catalyst to moral enslavement.
`Solitude was my only consolation ­ deep, dark, deathlike solitude.'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 1 (pg. 93)
Theme: Solipsism
Context: Being isolated, whether self-imposed or forcefully imposed, is an affliction that
consumes Frankenstein, the Creature and Walton.…read more

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God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring after his own image
but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very
resemblance.'
­ The Creature
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Doppelganger, monstrosity, creator/creature
Context: The creature is made in human likeness but reflects the monstrosity of
Frankenstein's idea.
`Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage
him, but I am solitary and abhorred.'
­ The Creature
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg.…read more

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Context: The creature's self-education
`I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense
I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered
the flesh and bone.'
­ The Creature
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education he C
`My daily vows rose for revenge ­ a deep and deadly revenge.'
­ The Creature
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg.…read more

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Did I not, as his maker, owe him all the portion of happiness that it
was within my power to bestow?'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education
`I shuddered that future ages might curse me as their pest.'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg.…read more

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Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education
`A high destiny seemed to bear on me, until I fell, never, never again
to rise.'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education
`They are dead and but one feeling in such a solitude can persuade
me to preserve my life...…read more

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Seek happiness in tranquility, and avoid ambition'
­ Frankenstein
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education
`Evil thenceforth became my good...the completion of my
demoniacal design became an insatiable passion.'
­ The Creature
Where: Volume 2, Chapter 7 (pg. 133)
Theme: Prejudice, human ignorance, monstrosity
Context: The creature's self-education
`I was once nourished with high thoughts of honor and devotion but
now crime has degraded me beneath the meanest animal.…read more

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