Extreme Weather

Extreme Weather 

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Extreme Weather
Definitions:
Extreme Weather:
Extreme weather is defined as weather that is particularly different to the norm for that area, such as
very hot temperatures in the UK, very cold in the Caribbean, dry in the rainforest or wet in the
desert, as well as events such as Hurricanes, Storms and Tornados. This means that weather
considered extreme in one place is not necessarily extreme somewhere else.
Hazard:
A hazard is something that has the potential to be dangerous, such as an active, but not currently
erupting, volcano.
Fieldwork:
Information collected by (me) (primary information) in the form or measurements, questionnaires
Research:
Secondary Information, such as information taken from newspaper articles, books, photos, the
internet etc.
Case Studies:
Thompson Canyon Flash Flood:
SEE PDF PRINTED OUT
Pakistan Floods 2010
Number of lives affected: 20 million people
Number of children affected: 10 million children
Number of homes damaged: 1.9 million homes
Death Toll: Over 2,000 people
Estimated Structural Damage: US $4 billion
Estimated Total Economic Impact: US $43 billion
Land Submerged: 17 million acres
Jobs Lost: 5.3 million jobs
In July 2010, devastating torrential floods displaced over 20 million people in Pakistan,
making the disaster worse than the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir
earthquake, and the 2010 Haiti earthquake combined. One fifth of the country, an area the
size of England, remains submerged under water. Two million hectares of crops have been
destroyed
European Heatwave 2003
SEE WIKI ARTICLE

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The Big Dry
SEE BBC ARTICLE
Hurricane Katrina
Katrina first hit Florida August 25 as a Category 1 storm, strengthened to a Category 5 from a Category
3 in just 12 hours over the Gulf of Mexico, then hit the Gulf coast August 29 as a weaker but dangerous
Category 3.
Here are some facts that indicate the ferocity of the storm:
Damage: $81 billion total; $40.…read more

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Whirling Cyclometer
Research Done:
Flood risk maps
General internet research
Newspapers
Books
Photos from the past…read more

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