Edexcel GCSE Music- Notes on Something's Coming

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  • Created on: 19-06-11 17:00
Preview of Edexcel GCSE Music- Notes on Something's Coming

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1958 Bernstein `Something's Coming'
West side story
Style and period Musical theatre
The piece has been influenced by Jazz
Different forms of a musical:
Vaudeville and burlesque
Opera-bouffe and operetta
Extravaganzas
Minstrelsy
Melodramas
Music theatre in the 20th century:
Broadway musicals
West end musicals
Rock operas
Vocal forms used in a musical:
Duet
Trio
Quartet
Quintet
Chorus
aria
Melody Short riffs (something due any day)
Mainly short phrases
Recitative-like vocal line makes Tony seem
more realistic
The word-setting is mostly syllabic (one
word to a syllable).
Last beat of bar is stressed
Highest note is a G above the stave and
lowest is E under the stave.
In the phrase `the air is humming', word
painting is used in the 1st violin part who
play a descant melody depicting a light
breeze.
Lyrical section (73-105) gives the piece as
sense of suspense and mystery and
creates a contrast.
From bar 13, The melody moves mainly by
step and falls by a 3rd
Melody features blue notes
Many notes are accented.

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Page 2

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Dynamics Varied and extreme dynamics
From ppp to ff
The pp at the start creates tension ­ gives it a
breathless agitated feel.
Ad lib fade at the end taking us into the music
for a change of scene
As Tony builds up his confidence there is a
crescendo to forte at the words `It may come
cannon balling down through the sky'. The
notes are sung marcato (accented).…read more

Page 3

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Section B1- same as B but without
repeated section
Section A1- provides sense of return and
balance
Outro- 1 bar repeated pattern with ad lib.
Leading into a scene change.…read more

Page 4

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Melody and accompaniment with mainly
chordal texture in the accompanying orchestral
parts.…read more

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