Digeston of Nutrients

Explanation of digestion with a link to a website

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Digestion and absorption of nutrients
What happens to food once we have eaten it?
To allow the body to use the nutrients in food for energy, growth, repair and
maintenance, the food must be broken down or digested.
Digestive process
MOUTH ­ tongue pushes food around, teeth bite,
tear and grind food into small pieces
SALIVA ­ salivary amylase breaks down
the STARCH into SUGAR
Food is swallowed into the stomach
PEPSIN starts the digestion of
PROTEINS into AMINO ACIDS
The liver produces BILE which emulsifies FATS
Food stays in the stomach for 45 hours where
it is moved around by muscle action and mixed
with GASTRIC JUICES
Food then passes down the small intestine (duodenum)
where enzymes PROTEINASE continues to break
down the proteins.
FAT is broken down into glycerol by LIPASE
CARBOHYDRATES into GLUCOSE by AMYLASE
Food then passes into the second part of the
small intestine (ileum)
Where most of the nutrients are absorbed into
the bloodstream and are carried around the body
finally, the undigested food including FIBRE
passes into the large intestine (colon) and is excreted
through the anus
http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/digestive_system.html
Water
Almost 70% of the body is made up of water. It is needed for
body fluids, such as blood, sweat and urine
regulation of body temperature
body process such as digestion
preventing dehydration
Water in the Diet
Many foods such as fruit and vegetables provide water, but we mainly get water
from DRINKS: fruit juices, tea, coffee, water.
We need about 3 litres a day. The best way is to drink at least 68 glasses of tap
water every day.

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WATER aids digestion by helping to get rid of waste products from the large
intestine, to prevent constipation and to filter impurities from the kidneys by the
production of urine.…read more

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