Coursework : What was the impact of the Provisional government

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What was the short term impact of the Provisional Government's reforms on
the Russian people and government?
After the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II, a Provisional Government assumed control of Russia,
declaring her a republic in February 1917. Source E describes the joy felt by some peasants with
"revolutionary ideas", believing that the government would give them "freedom" by introducing
land reforms. Source C partially agrees with source E stating that, Prime Minister Kerensky knew
Russia's problems, and was "preparing to meet them" with effective reforms. Source A however
suggests the short term impact of the government was "repressive", for it did not embrace the
revolutionary sprit of the people displayed in Source E, for example, the government had "capital
punishment applied to revolutionary propagandists". Source G emphasises the government's lack of
willingness for reforms, as they didn't "want this revolution during hostilities". Therefore, the
government continued "prosecuting the war to victory", instead of implementing reforms with great
impacts.
Following the February 1917 revolution, people greatly anticipated the reforms the Provisional
Government would introduce. However, five months later, certain people were discontented with
the new reforms, for not having the expected impacts, prompting journalist John Reed in source A to
label them as "ineffective reforms". As Reed "experienced" Russian life, spoke to ordinary Russians,
gaining their opinions of the new reforms, allowing him to understand how they felt, about the
impact of the reforms brought in by the government. Reed was in Russia from "September 1916",
during the beginning of the Provisional Government's time in power .Perhaps allowing him to witness
their support decline, for failing to bring in the reforms that some people desired. This lack of
support due to the government's "ineffective reforms" agrees with evidence from Source D. The
Petrograd Socialist Revolutionaries state their "support for the Provisional Government", but
"reversing the right to change its attitude", if the government failed to introduce certain reforms.
This shows that, the impacts of government reforms affected their popularity, and that not all people
were certain that their reforms would be effective.
Reed followed "many prominent Bolsheviks", suggesting that, his views of the government's
reforms may have been influenced by them, for they offered Reed a Bolshevik perspective
concerning the impacts of the government's reforms. A point made more likely as Lenin, who viewed
the Provisional Government as "landowner and bourgeois domination", as stated in source F, had
returned to Russia whilst Reed was writing his book. Source A largely views the short term impact of
the government's reforms as, "ineffective", going so far as to suggest that the government was
"repressive".
Source A goes on to state that, a majority of Russians didn't want the Provisional Government in
power, as this went "against the overwhelming sentiment of the country". Perhaps this suggests
that, many didn't want the Provisional Government in power, for maybe they didn't expect their
reforms to greatly impact Russia. This opinion isn't shared by Source E, a visitor recounting peasant
recollections of the February revolution.
Source E states that, peasants and soldiers anticipated the government's land reforms, they had
been "promised", thus potentially greatly impacting the peasants, by solving a long standing issue,
gaining their support. As the source was written just after the February revolution, it is possible that
the aforementioned peasants were excited by the prospect of change, without fully understanding
what the Provisional Government intended to reform specifically. Additionally the visitor's view
stems from "Ulfa Province" whereas Reed spoke to "many prominent Bolshevik leaders "in order to

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What was the short term impact of the Provisional Government's reforms on
the Russian people and government?
form his view. Perhaps, allowing Reed to understand to whether or not the government's reforms
had positive impacts, according to the views of Russian politicians. Source E is of the opinion that the
short term impact of the Provisional Government's reforms could have been great; however they
only "promised" such reforms, for the time being.…read more

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What was the short term impact of the Provisional Government's reforms on
the Russian people and government?
Government was partly formed because members of the State Duma thought that, the impact of a
new government with public support was more likely to achieve military victory.
After the implementation of Order Number One, the Provisional Government lost control of the
army. Disrupting the government's reform programme, as certain ministers such as Milyukov,
believed that victory was pivotal to the success of the government.…read more

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What was the short term impact of the Provisional Government's reforms on
the Russian people and government?…read more

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