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AS CITIZENSHIP STUDIES

UNIT 1

CHAPTER 1:

`WHAT IS A CITIZEN, AND WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE BRITISH?'




WHAT IS A CITIZEN?

A citizen is a member of a nation state. By being a member of a nation state a citizen has
rights (e.g. free speech, free health care,…

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CITIZEN'S RIGHTS AND DUTIES

Following the Human Rights Act (1998), citizens of a democratic nation state enjoy both
human rights and legal rights. Human rights are the rights we are born with (e.g. the right
to live free from persecution and oppression etc.), and they cannot be given or taken…

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community and a loss of public interest in Christianity (secularism). The issue here
is, what is England's national focus and what is there to believe in and support?

English national identity however is defined by the social groups we belong to
(e.g. family, community, education, workplace, region etc.) and our…

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Legal rights: rights or entitlements citizens are granted by a state and which can be
taken away.

Welfare state: a system which provides health and economic support and benefits
for those citizens who find themselves unemployed, elderley or sick.

Citizenship test: a 45 minute exam which tests foreigners on British…

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AS CITIZENSHIP STUDIES

UNIT 1

CHAPTER 2:

`HOW SOCIALLY DIVERSE IS BRITAIN?'




POPULATION

A country's population is determined by its birth rate, death rate and net migration. There
are more people entering the UK (immigrants) than leaving the country (emigrants); also
people are living longer (life expectancy). As a result,…

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Immigration increased rapidly after 1948 when the SS Empire Windrush arrived from the
Caribbean to bring workers to fill skilled and semi-skilled jobs which British workers didn't
want. This was followed in the 1950s by migrant workers arriving from India and Pakistan to
seek better employment and education in the…

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THREE MODELS OF RACE RELATIONS IN THE UK

A MORI poll conducted in 2005 found that 62% of people believe multiculturalism makes
Britain a better place; 32% believe it to be a threat to the British way of life; 58% believe
immigrants should adopt British values/traditions; while 28% believe immigrants…

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WHAT IS STEREOTYPING?

Prejudice (whether racism, sexism, ageism, homophobia etc.) is based on an active belief in
stereotypes. In this case stereotypes are ill-informed generalisations about members of a
certain social group (such as their looks, beliefs, behaviour, lifestyle etc.) which then makes it
easier to put forward negative and/or…

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Ethnic cleansing: the expulsion or extermination of masses of people due to their
cultural and/or religious identity and background.

Refugees: immigrants who have left their country of origin to avoid persecution,
violence or death.

Homogeneity: similarity or sameness.

Race: shared genetic descent and physical characteristics.

Multi-ethnic society: a diverse range…

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UNIT 1

CHAPTER 3:

`PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION AND DISADVANTAGE'




PREJUDICE

Prejudice means to make one's mind up about members of a social group without fully
understanding their beliefs, customs, perspectives or cultural background. Prejudice then
leads to the unfair treatment of this social group, i.e. discrimination.


FORMS OF PREJUDICE

Many different…

Comments

safiyyah khalid

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thankz

Johnbaker

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great!

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