Citizenship Unit 1

meeehheheh meehhhh meehehehh

HideShow resource information
Preview of Citizenship Unit 1

First 274 words of the document:

AS CITIZENSHIP STUDIES
UNIT 1
CHAPTER 1:
`WHAT IS A CITIZEN, AND WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE BRITISH?'
WHAT IS A CITIZEN?
A citizen is a member of a nation state. By being a member of a nation state a citizen has
rights (e.g. free speech, free health care, free education etc.) and responsibilities (e.g. to
be law-abiding and to contribute to the well-being of the nation state).
For a nation state to operate effectively it is important that its citizens share common
values (e.g. equality, justice, prosperity etc.) and also a common identity (e.g. a sense of
Britishness, history and heritage, patriotism etc.)
A subject is different from a citizen however. A subject does not have the same rights as a
citizen and can be understood as `second-class', e.g. Jews in Nazi Germany, blacks in South
Africa under aparthied etc. A democratic society like the UK has citizens however, not
subjects.
ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP
In 1997 The Crick Report argued the need for active citizenship in the UK where citizens
were `active' and `responsible' in `participating effectively in society'. It was pointed out
however that there is a difference between `active citizenship' and `good citizenship', i.e.
being `nice and fair' is simply not enough, people need to be practical and constructive in
their efforts, e.g. arranging a party for deprived children is not as effective as setting up an
after-school club where deprived children can learn important social skills like team building,
independence etc.
1

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

CITIZEN'S RIGHTS AND DUTIES
Following the Human Rights Act (1998), citizens of a democratic nation state enjoy both
human rights and legal rights. Human rights are the rights we are born with (e.g. the right
to live free from persecution and oppression etc.), and they cannot be given or taken away
by the state. Legal rights however are given by the state (e.g. freedom of speech and
expression etc.) and can also be taken away, e.g.…read more

Page 3

Preview of page 3

Here's a taster:

Christianity (secularism). The issue here
is, what is England's national focus and what is there to believe in and support?
English national identity however is defined by the social groups we belong to
(e.g. family, community, education, workplace, region etc.) and our shared culture
(e.g. our beliefs, attitudes, norms, customs and habits).
Essential factors which inform national identity and our rights can be understood
by using the D.I.S.G.R.A.C.E. mnemonic, i.e. disability (physical/mental), income,
sexuality, gender, race/religion, age, class and education.…read more

Page 4

Preview of page 4

Here's a taster:

Legal rights: rights or entitlements citizens are granted by a state and which can be
taken away.
Welfare state: a system which provides health and economic support and benefits
for those citizens who find themselves unemployed, elderley or sick.
Citizenship test: a 45 minute exam which tests foreigners on British society, history
and culture and who wish to become British citizens.
Culture: ways of living in a society, the beliefs, attitudes, norms, customs and habits
we all share as citizens.…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Citizenship Studies resources:

See all Citizenship Studies resources »See all resources »