Advanced English Terminology

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  • Created on: 01-06-14 14:42
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Josie
English
Terminology
Over
View
of
Genre,
Audience,
Purpose,
Discourse
structure,
Pragmatics,
Phonology,
Syntax,
Lexis,
main
Sub
Rhetorical
devices,
Grammar,
Figurative
Language
and
Tone
headings:
Adjacency
Parallel
expressions
uses
between
individuals
in
conversation.
Eg)
How
are
you?
/
Fine
Pairs
thanks
Contraction
Reduced
form
of
a
word.
Eg)
Can't
=
Cannot,
She'll
=
She
will
Omission
or
slurring
of
sounds
or
syllables
of
individual
words.
Eg)
gonna
=
going
to,
Elision
wannabe
=
want
to
be
Discourse
Words
that
are
used
to
signal
a
change
in
subject.
Eg)
'Anyway
moving
on....'
'Whats
Marker
more..'
'On
the
other
hand'
Idiolect
An
individual's
distinctive
style
of
speaking
Sociolect
A
group
of
people's
distinctive
style
of
speaking
Prosodic
Includes:
stress,
rhythm,
pitch,
tempo
and
intonation
which
all
carry
various
connotations
Features
and
denotations
specific
to
the
speaker
and
conversation
Non-fluency
Typical
and
normal
characteristics
of
spoken
language
that
interrupt
the
flow
of
the
Features
speech.
Eg)
Hesitations,
false
starts,
fillers,
repetitions,
overlaps
and
intrruptions
Paralinguistic
Related
to
body
language
and
other
non-verbal
elements.
Eg)
'laughter'
'
Features
Grammar
Word
Class
Collective
Noun
that
relates
to
a
group
of
individuals.
Noun
Eg)
Gang,
Family,
Crew
Possessive
Noun
that
signifies
belonging
or
possession.
Pronoun
Eg)
Mine,
ours,
his,
hers,
theirs
Verbs
that
initiate
possibility.
Modal
Verb
Eg)
can,
could,
might,
should
Frequency
Adverbs
that
denote
frequency.
adverbs
Eg)
Always,
sometimes,
often
Degree
Adverbs
that
indicate
to
what
degree.
adverb
Eg)
almost,
Nearly,
Quite
Personal
indicates
a
personal
relationship
or
attachment
to
subject.
pronoun
Eg)
i,
me,
us,
you,
he,
she,
it
a
Pronoun
that
introduces
a
relative
clause
referring
to
the
anecdote
-
creates
a
Relative
complex/compound
sentence.
Pronoun
Eg)
Who,
Whom,
whose,
which
Indefinite
Pronoun
regarding
multiple
/
wide
majority.
Pronoun
Eg)
anyone,
everyone,
anything
Reflexive
Compounded
with
-self
to
emphasise
affect.
Pronoun
Eg)
yourself,
themselves,
yourselves
Used
to
connect
clauses
or
individual
sentences
to
make
one
sentence
Conjunctions
Eg)
and,
but,
if

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Josie
English
Terminology
Superlative
-est
used
to
exaggerate
and
describe.
sometimes
hyperbolaic
(Exaggerated).
Eg)
the
adjective
BIGGEST
castle
in
the
world!
Eg)
biggest,
smallest,
tallest,
thinnest,
widest
-er
Comparative
used
to
compare
and
gain
a
preferred
reading/bias
view
adjective
Eg)
'my
castles
BIGGER
than
yours
Eg)
Smaller,
bigger,
taller,
thinner,
wider
Theories
and
Spoken
Transcripts
and
conversations
and
general
spoken
language
texts
discourse
Grice
proposed
4
basic
conversational
rules
for
a
'Successful
conversation':
1)
Quantity
-
Grice's
don't
say
too
much
or
too
little.…read more

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Josie
English
Terminology
-
Subjective
narrative
voice/point
of
view
-
Personal
Pronouns
-
Persuasive
techniques
Argue
-
Hyperbole
(Exaggeration)
-
Direct
address,
You!
They!
-
Antithesis
-
we
are
amazing,
they
are
awful!
(opposing
good
and
bad)
-
Modal
verbs-
Reflexive
pronouns
-
Personal
anekdotes
and
experiences-
Truthful,
validity
Advise
-
Facts
and
figures-
Cause
and
effect,
situations
and
their
solutions
-
Transition
words
'if'....'then'....
-
Formal
tone-
some
emotive
language
-
Transition
words
'if'....'then'....…read more

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Josie
English
Terminology
Exclamation
mark
present
Exclamative
Eg.
No!""
Declaring
statement.
Declarative
Eg.
I
hate
spiders.""
Words
that
refer
to
something
previously
in
the
text,
verbal
pointing.
Eg)
'This'
'That'
Deixis
'There'
Bathos
Produces
or
results
in
an
anticlimax
or
disappointment
sometimes
used
to
produce
humour
Umbrella
terms
Hyponyms
Eg.…read more

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