Accents & Dialects Glossary

This document is particularly useful for students covering this topic for A2 exams. It contains a glossary of key terminologies for accents and dialects. Good Luck  

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  • Created on: 11-02-12 11:17
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Accents & Dialects Glossary
Accent: pronunciation peculiar to a particular person or place
Anticipatory
pronoun: construction containing a pronoun or verb phrase used as an emphatic tag (e.g. I play
football, me or he's a madman, is David)
Auxiliary verb: finite verb used in compound verbal constructions (e.g. I have done, we are going, did
you know)
Broad
BATH accent: the use of a long vowel in words such as bath, grass, laugh and dance
Code
switching: alternating between two or more languages within the same utterance a common
feature of bilingual speakers
Conjunction word used to connect words, clauses or sentences
Connected
speech
processes: the way particular combinations of sounds are pronounced in words or phrases during
normal continuous speech
Consonant
Cluster
reduction the way some consonants are deleted in particular combinations of sounds (e.g. best
becomes `bes', respect becomes `respeck' and land becomes `lan')(Caribbean English)
Definite article
reduction: contracted pronunciation of the word the(generally as a <t> sound or as a glottal stop or,
when preceding a vowel, as a <th> sound) (Leeds)
Dialect: variety of speech differing from the standard or literary language and characterised by local
vocabulary, constructions or pronunciations
Diphthong: combination of two vowel sounds
Doric: traditional dialect of North East Scotland (Stonehaven)
Filler: word or phrase that carries no semantic meaning, but is part of spoken grammar
(e.g.like, sort of or you know what I mean). (Withernsea, Gloucester, Plymouth,
Stonehaven)
Flat BATH
accent: the use of a short vowel in words such as bath, grass, laugh and dance
Geordie: dialect and/or accent of NewcastleuponTyne (and Tyneside generally). (Byker, Geordie)
Glottal stop: sound produced by the sudden opening or shutting of the glottis (as in the sound between
the two oh's in the exclamation, oh oh!)
Grammar: way in which individual words change appearance according to function (e.g. tense, plurality
etc.) and are combined in phrases and sentences
High rising
Terminal: use of a rising intonation on a statement that is not necessarily a question (`upspeak').
(Plymouth, London)
Hdropping: deletion of an initial <h> in words such as happy and house. (Sheffield, Hackney, Maerdy,
Caribbean English)

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Accents & Dialects Glossary
Historic
present: verbal construction used as an alternative to the simple past tense when telling a story or
relating a series of connected events in the past (e.g. I says, I goes etc.)
Historic
Perfect: compound verbal construction used as an alternative to the simple past tense when telling
a story or relating a series of connected events in the past (e.g. I`ve seen, I`ve goneetc.…read more

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Accents & Dialects Glossary
Reflexive
Pronoun: myself (mysell, mysen), yourself (yoursell, yoursen, thyself, thysen), himself (hisself,
hissell, hissen), herself (hersell, hersen), itself, ourselves, (usselves, oursells,
oursens), themselves (theirselves, theirsells, theirsens). Geordie Grammar
Rhotic: rhotic speakers pronounce the <r> sound after a vowel in words such as start, north,
nurse, near, square, cure and letter.…read more

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Accents & Dialects Glossary
Yod: <y> sound after the initial consonant and preceding an <oo> vowel in words like few,
pure and huge
Yod
coalescence: blending of the <y> sound with the <t, d, s, z> sound preceding an <oo> vowel
(e.g. dunebecomes June and tissue becomes `tishoo'). (Harrow School)
Yod retention: pronunciation of a <y> sound after a <t, d, s, z> sound preceding an <oo> vowel
(e.g. tune, dune, suit, visual).…read more

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