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Does anyone have a right to child?
Natural Law says that one of the Primary Precepts, a key purpose
of human life, is reproduction. The Theory of Evolution says that
the instinct to reproduce explains why our genes have survived for
so long. Does this however, mean we have the right to have a
child? And is this right affected by nature ­ can someone us
surrogacy; for example means to gain a child. If this right to have a
child exists then who should have this `right'? For example, should
a single person or a gay couple be allowed IVF?
There are more controversial ways of having
children, including surrogacy. Which can create
a conflict of rights. How do we determine if
surrogacy is ethical?…read more

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Utilitarianism is interested in the greater good. Utilitarian's ask
what the outcomes of infertility treatments are. They would balance
the pleasure of having a baby against the anguish of unsuccessful
treatments. Whereas Kant is interested in the good will, a will that
does the right thing, regardless of the outcome. He would not be
interested in the agony of childlessness. To find out what the right
thing is, Kant would firstly universalise a maxim, turning it into a
universal law.
The Bible may be used to support or attack the use of
infertility treatments. In Genesis, God made humans and
the first instruction he gave them was to 'go forth and
multiply'. Therefore many Christians argue, as humans
were made in God's image, we too may create, or use our
given intellects to overcome infertility.…read more

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Catholics generally believe in the natural law;
that reproduction is one of the five primary
precepts of Natural Law and one of the reasons
why God made humans; According to Aquinas,
was to reproduce. Along with situation ethics;
when a couple are desperate to have a child,
infertility treatments can fulfil the needs, wishes
and hopes of many couples.…read more

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No "Right" to a Child (2378-2379)
Every child is a gift, not a piece of property. He/she is
not owned by anyone. No one has "a right to a child."
Only the child has genuine rights. The child must be
"the fruit of a specific act of the conjugal love of his
parents" and to "be respected as a person from the first
moment of conception" (Gift of Life) - From the
Catechism of the Catholic Church, Simplified.…read more


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