A case against Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis.

A description of the studies that stand as evidence against Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis including the Koluchova twins (1972), Rutter and the English and Romanian adoptees (ERA) study team (1998), Anna Freud and Sophie Dann (1951). 

HideShow resource information
Preview of A case against Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis.

First 512 words of the document:

To present a case against Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis ­
"The effects of deprivation cannot be reversed".
Support from the work of Koluchova, Freud and Dann and Rutter.
Koluchova (1972) ­ Czech twins.
Twin Czechoslovakian boys lost their mother shortly after birth.
They were placed into an institution, then in the care of their aunt before returning
to their father and new stepmother at the age of 18 months old.
They suffered abuse and were found at the age of 6 ­ Mentally retarded, scared, and
malnourished and with little speech.
After being in a children's home they were fostered by two sisters and provided with
exceptional care.
By the age of 11, the boys developed normal speech and by 14 had a normal IQ. At
the age of 20, the boys were in relationships and were working.
The study of the Koluchova twins shows that with exceptional care provided to children
whilst they are still quite young, the effects of privation and deprivation can be reversed.
These two boys never had a chance to develop a proper relationship with a care giver when
they were babies however this did not affect their ability to make relationships in their adult
lives. However they may have dealt with the privation in their early childhood because they
had an attachment with each other and were not deprived of any relationship at all.
Rutter and the English and Romanian adoptees (ERA) study team (1998)
This was a longitudinal study
Investigating the effects of early privation on Romanian orphans adopted by English
families compared with adopted children born in England.
The Romanian children all experienced Romanian orphanages of poor quality from a
very young age and were either adopted before six months or between six months
and two years.
111 Romanian adoptees were compared with 52 English adoptees, all aged four, on a
range of measures.
They were developmentally delayed when they were adopted at six months.
They caught up in weight, height, head circumference and cognitive level with the
English children.
Children adopted later in life also made progress but not as significantly as those
adopted at a younger age.
The negative aspects of poor quality orphanage care had long term psychological and
physical effects on the older children, therefore meaning recovery was slower.
A minority of the Romanian orphans suffered from attachment disorder: they were
attention seeking and non-selective in choice of friendships and relationships.
This pattern of attachment remained in many of the children at the age of 11.
This study shows that although the children suffered from deprivation issues, when they
were adopted and brought into a new environment of a proper family who cared for them
properly these issues were short-term. The children who were adopted by the age of six
months old made a better recovery by four years old. This suggests that the effects of

Other pages in this set

Page 2

Preview of page 2

Here's a taster:

To present a case against Bowlby's maternal deprivation hypothesis ­
"The effects of deprivation cannot be reversed".
Support from the work of Koluchova, Freud and Dann and Rutter.
deprivation can be reversed however a child is more likely to recover the younger they are
that their situation changes.
Anna Freud and Sophie Dann (1951)
Studied and cared for six children raised in a concentration camp in Theresienstadt.
The children all lost their parents and were raised by the prisoners of war but with
infrequent care.…read more

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all resources »