What type of learner are you?

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Windowswind wrote:

I always considered History to be more interesting then Geography (although Geography is considerably easier in my opinion). English... although I am 1 of 5 boys in the top set, I still don't feel I would be qualified enough to teach it, and I find it very tedious, except for the creative aspect of it. Unfortunatley, a lot of the course seems to be either surrounding shakespeare or analyzing aspects of a multitude of texts. The only creative writing section of it is, to me, not creative writing as I percieve it to be story writing, rather than being forced to write withing a certain fixed range, and being told the target audience and plot of the 'story'. :P

I'm not sure which year you're in but it sounds like you're doing GCSEs so at this stage I should hope you don't feel qualified to teach any subjects! A level English language and literature (as separate courses) are very different to GCSE level so you might find you enjoy it more then if you continue during your A levels.

If you have QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) then this lets you teach anything. A lot of people do their PGCE in one subject area then teach in another subject area, or teach two or three subjects in school even though they only trained in one area. As long as the subject knowledge in there you can be a good teacher regardless of what it is you're teaching if you've got a good teaching style.

Posted: 16-10-12 12:17 by Emma (admin)

Sorry for not making it clear :P

I meant if did an English - literature or language -  course at university, or if I did a Maths course at university, I know which I would be more capable of doing before I even have to decide which courses to pick. :)

Yes, I'm doing my GCSE courses (I'm currently in Year 10).

In reference to the QTS and PGCE, wouldn't most employers look for a degree in the subject you want to teach in, despite having a PGCE - although I'm not sure  how it works.

Modified twice, last modified by Windowswind on Tue 16th October, 2012 @ 16:10

Posted: 16-10-12 16:02 by Windowswind

Emma (admin) wrote:

Thegirlwhoknewtoomuch wrote:

 I have always thought it is a bit stupid putting labels on how you learn as they don't always fit, I did the test and my results were very mixed. I came out as a auditory learner but I don't find it easy to learn my sounds, I just like to write everything down, thats how I remember things and it worked for my gcse's.

That's a good point as surely it should be about finding techniques that work for you rather than sticking you into a box? Have you tried playing music in the background whilst you're working?

When I did my GCSEs I started listening to the Phantom of the Opera soundtrack when I was working (the new version of the film had recently been released) and I did that all of the way through my A levels, undergrad degree, PGCE and I still do it now when I need to focus. I never listen to this soundtrack at any other time other than when I'm working and I think over the 10 years or so that I've been doing it, I've developed an association with this music and working. Most of my revision and the way I work is writing things out and condensing notes into smaller and smaller things, but I like the music side of auditory learning.

 I can only listen to music when doing light revision like copying up notes, when i'm doing homework or other work where i need to concentrate more i don't listen to music. Listening to music does help me concentrate on revision as it stops me getting bored XD

Posted: 16-10-12 16:12 by Thegirlwhoknewtoomuch - Team GR

Windowswind wrote:

Sorry for not making it clear :P

I meant if did an English - literature or language -  course at university, or if I did a Maths course at university, I know which I would be more capable of doing before I even have to decide which courses to pick. :)

Yes, I'm doing my GCSE courses (I'm currently in Year 10).

In reference to the QTS and PGCE, wouldn't most employers look for a degree in the subject you want to teach in, despite having a PGCE - although I'm not sure  how it works.

Oh ok, well even so I think that it's likely your opinions will change during the course of your GCSEs and A levels before you get to applying to university. You might find yourself suddenly excelling at a subject you didn't really enjoy much at KS3 and vice versa - I've known people who hated maths in Y9 to go on to study maths at university, for example.

No, not really. Schools care about whether you're a good teacher. They want someone who understands the curriculum and understands the subject, or is willing to learn. This doesn't really have to come from doing a degree as in some cases (eg: English literature or history) you might never study one of the texts on the A level or GCSE syllabus in your entire degree. Obviously, if you were applying for your first teaching post with a degree in English, a PGCE in English then you were applying for a maths teaching job then the school might question it but if the subjects are similar (eg: you have a media studies degree, did a PGCE in English and are applying for an English and media studies job) then it's more down to how you perform at interview and exemplify your subject knowledge. It's also worth pointing out that there's a really popular graduate scheme called Teach First which encourages graduates who may not otherwise consider teaching to give it a go and places them in a school based on their A level subjects as well as their degree. I know people who have degrees in law, history and sociology who are currently teaching maths at GCSE and KS3, for example.

So the short answer is, your undergrad degree won't really restrict what you teach in practice, no. It may restrict the teacher training courses you can apply for (although given how quick the profession is changing it is likely to be really different in 7/8 years time when you apply!) and therefore potentially the very early years of a teaching career, but beyond that there's more flexibility.

Posted: 16-10-12 17:00 by Emma (admin)

Emma (admin) great advice thanks, i was wondering how it all works.

Posted: 16-10-12 17:18 by Thegirlwhoknewtoomuch - Team GR

Thanks Emma! You really helped me understand it more.

So, is PGCE a mini course in a subject? Or would it be a full time thing?

Thanks in advance :)

Posted: 16-10-12 17:43 by Windowswind