What is the best technique to absorb most of the information read from an revision guide?

  • 0 votes

I am currently getting straights A grades but lack to get the a star needed so any useful tips .. Thanks in return :)

Posted Tue 17th May, 2011 @ 21:21 by Shoaib

12 Answers

  • 6 votes

Read, re read and read again. Read first time with a highlighter. Re read with a different colour. And lastly read the highlighted points. (If you don't want to touch the book, photocopy) Each time highlighting the important bits.

With this information, write some notes. Then from those notes, make flashcards using the highlighted stuff. Using those flashcards, make a poster, powerpoint, mind maps, you name it. Whatever helps you learn. If you prefer listening... record yourself reading the notes and listen to it when you're going to bed, on the way to school/college. You'll be surprised how fast you'll pick stuff up.

Whack the posters up everywhere you go daily. Kitchen, bedroom. Inside your wardrobe. Whatever works for you. :D

Good luck!

Answered Tue 17th May, 2011 @ 21:57 by Michaela
  • 4 votes

I have the exact same problem, i want to get A* but i get mainly As, I suppose its alright but since I've changed my revision techniques, I've started getting better grades. I tend to get bored of reivising really quick and anything i do revise, i don't tend to take parts in but here are some of the new techniques I used. 

My first step of reivisng is where i simply read through everything. I then read each individual page or spread and pretend to explain what I've read to someone else from memory. After reading parts I doidn't mention and having a basic idea on what's on the page or spread, I make notes from memory. I do this as either a revision sheet, poster or mindmap. I then repeat this for every page.

Once Iv done this for all the pages, I make a revision guide and also design questions for the topic that cover all the information. I then put each question on a flashcard and asnwer them. After a while, I become familiar with the answers and learn the topic quite well. Flashcards for me are the best way. I also tend to revise in small chunks and try not to take in everything at once.

Another weird technique I use is, when revising a apply a certain perfume and only for when im revising. For the test I apply the same perfume and it helps jog your memory (scientifically proven too). It's strange but it works for me and a lot of other people. Since I've been doing this, I've managed to get quite a bit of A*s! Good luck in your examsss :D

Answered Mon 13th June, 2011 @ 20:58 by Saba987
  • 3 votes

Read then make a summary, then quiz yourself on what you've learned, then reread the summaries.

Answered Wed 18th May, 2011 @ 09:35 by Beth Haworth
  • 3 votes

before you go to sleep read over the revision guide because whilst you are sleeping your brain takes in the information, this normally works for me, but different people have different ways of revising.

Answered Wed 18th May, 2011 @ 21:33 by Alice Deane
  • 3 votes

You remember most of what you say and write. I would recomend first finding out what type of learnenr you are. then i find it useful to colour code different topics and making little drawings to promt my memory. this works really well if you have a funny image as you are more likely to remember it.

Step one: read small bits of information aloud

Step two: write it out in your own words

Step three: re read your notes

NEVER REVISE FOR MORE THAN HALF AN HOUR AT A TIME- DO 25 MINS FOLLOWED BY A 5 MINUTE BREAK, THEN RECAP WHAT YOU DID AND THEN CONTINUE FOR ANOTHER 25 MINUTES UNTIL YOU FEEL YOU HAVE DONE ENOUGH.

Set your day into three blocks of three hours. plan what you want to do. plan to revise in two blocks and treat yourself in one block. e.g I wnat to go shopping in the after noon so i will revise for 3 hours in the morning and evening but allow myself to go shopping in the afternoon. OR i am not a morning person so i will lie in in the morning, the work in the afternoon and evening.

Hope this helps :)

Answered Thu 19th May, 2011 @ 10:43 by Lauren Godin
Edited by Lauren Godin on Thu 19th May, 2011 @ 10:47
  • 2 votes

You have to rewrite something three times before it is put into long term memory so what I do is read the article slowly taking in every word and then skim read. I then make notes from what i've read and condense them until they are simple enough for me to remember, by doing this i absorb the information and it makes it easier to do some quick revision.

Answered Wed 18th May, 2011 @ 18:33 by Anna
  • 2 votes

You remember most of what you say and write. I would recomend first finding out what type of learnenr you are. then i find it useful to colour code different topics and making little drawings to promt my memory. this works really well if you have a funny image as you are more likely to remember it.

Step one: read small bits of information aloud

Step two: write it out in your own words

Step three: re read your notes

NEVER REVISE FOR MORE THAN HALF AND HOUR AT A TIME

Answered Thu 19th May, 2011 @ 10:43 by Lauren Godin
  • 1 vote

To get the A* in exams you need to go beyond the syllabs. So for example in law an individual may do some background reading to get more marka in the exam.
You also need to be able to apply your knowledge, not simply recall it!

Answered Tue 17th May, 2011 @ 21:30 by Jamie Cockcroft
  • 1 vote

Make questions before you start revising then make sure by the end of it you can answer them all,then you will know if you've learn it. Also there's plenty of videos on the bbc class clips related to what you're learning, hope that helped x

Answered Wed 18th May, 2011 @ 16:41 by Anon
  • 1 vote

background knowledge of the topic

take breaks

rewrite from the textbook into shorter notes-> mae them colourful so it is interesting to read

Answered Wed 18th May, 2011 @ 19:13 by Tiffany
  • 1 vote

Quickly read through a chapter then test yourself - possibly on the tests provided.

Then, re read all of the bits you are struggling on and test yourself again.

Also, make notes on the basics of each topic, but don't copy.

If you're still stuck, ask your teacher to go through it.

Answered Sun 5th June, 2011 @ 19:47 by Sarah
  • 1 vote

personally i think it's best to not just read the book, but make brief notes -as revision cards, mind maps, or even say it out loud!! You must adapt the information, not just memorise it :) 

also try and think of it everday as part of your life, e.g. test yourself - this steel fork is an alloy of iron and chromium....etc, to help you understand the topic !! :) hope that helps x

Answered Tue 14th June, 2011 @ 14:06 by Arjun