how can you stick to the point (instead of rambling) when you're writing in a exam?

  • 0 votes

I have a real trouble sticking to the point when I'm told to write something reasonably long. example: last english exam I ended up writing 11 pages of the same thing!! I got told I had some good points but it was very long!!!! :P Also happens in science exams when there is that long question worth 8 marks. I might end up getting form 2-4 marks at the most even though I'll be writing off the page!!!!! Please help me!!!!!!

Posted Fri 4th January, 2013 @ 18:41 by Molly

5 Answers

  • 3 votes

I've had the same problem before, but I've practiced a lot and you can get better at being concise.

Just plan it out methodically - give yourself a limit of 2 or 3 paragraphs for an extended essay and for each paragraph, plan: a topic sentence, a list of points to make, and a mini-conclusion sentence.

I usually go crazy on introductions, but a tip my english teacher gave me is that you only need 2 sentences to introduce an essay. The first sentence introduces the whole topic and shows you know your stuff (e.g. in English it might be, "Romeo and Juliet is a tragic depiction of love and death") and the second sentence answers the question. (so... "There are many features of the language which show Juliet is innocent").

And as long as you focus every sentence on answering the question, and only mention something if it's completely relevant, it's very difficult to "go off on one" :P

Hope this helps :)

Answered Sat 12th January, 2013 @ 16:16 by Bethan
  • 2 votes

for questions that have lots of marks, try and make a plan, but don't spend to long on it. also, before your exam work out how much time you should spend on each section or question, that way you can write accordinly to how much time you have on that question or section. and if you find yourself running out of time for one question, stop writing and do on to the next question, that way you should get more marks from answering lots of questions than just answering one or two. i have the same problem as you, but the examiners don't usually mark you down for writing too much, but it just effects how much you write.

Answered Fri 4th January, 2013 @ 18:46 by Thegirlwhoknewtoomuch - Team GR
  • 2 votes
  • WRITE KEY WORD/PHRASES/THINKERS/IDEAS IN THE EXAM AS A STARTING POINT AND LOOK OUT FOR COMMAND WORD
  • E.G. IF A QUESTION TALKS ABOUT OUTLINING ATRIAL SYSTOLE, YOU SHOULD ONLY TALK ABOUT ATRIOLE SYSTOLE AND ONLY OUTLINE IT,. NOT EXPLAIN WHY IT HAPPENS... START BY SAYING THE MAIN KEY WORD I.E. "DURING ATRIAL SYSTOLE..."
  • GET STRAIGHT TO THE MAIN POINTS, AND DONT RAMBLE ABOUT IRRELEENT POINTS TO THE QUESTION
  • DO NOT OUTLINE THE HISTORY OF SOMTHING ONLY IF IT ASKS YOU TO
  • INTRO SHOULD BE ONLY 3 LINES LONG WITH THE MAIN IDEAS AND DONT EXPLAIN THEM, AS YOU WOULD DO SO IN THE ESSAY
  • GIVE CONCLUSION WHEN NEEDED
  • IF YOU ARE GOING TO WRITE A 11 PAGE ESSAY AT HOME, THINK TO YOUR SELF THAT WILL YOU ABLE TO REPLICATE THIS IN THE ACTUAL EXAM
  • PLAN YOUR ANSWERS IN PQE STYLE TO MAKE YOUR ESSAY CONSISR/COHERENT
Answered Sat 12th January, 2013 @ 21:44 by Ruby
Edited by Ruby on Sat 12th January, 2013 @ 21:45
  • 1 vote

when in the exam take in a highlighter and highlight the key words in the question. then when you are writing your essays keep referring back and see whether your point answers the question and if you are going off on a tangent then stop and use words such as therefore to link yourself back to the question meaning you are keeping to the point :) hope this helps.

Answered Mon 14th January, 2013 @ 10:02 by Emma Carson
  • 0 votes

The scheme answers are never really that complicated. You just have to revise the facts and link them to your question, but make sure they are reasonable. Hope this helps :)

Answered Fri 11th January, 2013 @ 19:04 by Crystal Blue ♥