how can having a history alevel help when going on to study Early Years Education?

  • 0 votes

I am in the middle of writing my personal statement for uni. I have chosen to do primary/early years education, however i am not to sure how history would fit in and my teacher said i have to mention something. What could i say about history ?

Posted Mon 1st October, 2012 @ 18:05 by Chloe

3 Answers

  • 1 vote

Chloe wrote:

I am in the middle of writing my personal statement for uni. I have chosen to do primary/early years education, however i am not to sure how history would fit in and my teacher said i have to mention something. What could i say about history ?

Hi Chloe,

You only need to talk about your History A level if it is relevant to why you want to study EYE. Not all subjects are going to fit perfectly to your degree level aspirations and that's perfectly fine - universities accept this.

A lot of applicants seem to think (and are told by their school) that they need to talk about each subject in turn and how it relates to the degree. In a lot of cases, applicants doing this are just wasting space, particularly if you mention all of the skills (eg: A level history has taught me how to analyses sources and develop an argument considering different perspectives, which will be useful at university) that the subject has given you because the university know this to be the case from simply looking at the fact you've studied A level History. The ability to analyse sources and look at different perspectives are part of the general course aims for an A level History course meaning every single person who has studied history will have also achieved the same skills.

If you've done anything in history which is really relevant such as studied education in the past or looked at something which really made you think "wow, this is exactly why I want to study EYE" then by all means include it but if nothing has made you think that then just focus on talking about the things which have aided this interest.

If you're applying for an EYE course that gives Qualified Teacher Status then the majority of your statement needs to talk about your work experience and how this experience has affirmed to you that you want to become a teacher and that you want to focus on EYFS stage.

Take a look at: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=2014507 for more help as well as http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Personal_Statement_Library

Answered Tue 2nd October, 2012 @ 15:02 by Emma (admin)
  • 1 vote

I think the thing to remember is that UCAS and university applications aren't most teacher's strengths - it's just an add on to their normal teaching jobs and they have very little training in it so most people rely on their own experiences of applying to university which is generally inaccurate or out of date which is why lots of these kind of things get said. I'm a teacher but I now work supporting applicants applying to university on GR's other site The Student Room, which is why I linked to it.

It's completely pointless to try and link all of your A level subjects if they're not overly relevant as universities accept that they're not all going to be and 47 lines is only space for you to focus on the most relevant things to why you want to teach. It's a really good idea to talk about H&S GCSE as that's really applicable, but if you're struggling for ways to link history then you don't need to include it. It's your PS at the end of the day and your job is to take all of the advice you're given and decide which bits you want to follow and include.

Answered Wed 3rd October, 2012 @ 09:14 by Emma (admin)
  • 0 votes

Thanks for your response. I am very grateful as I thought the same but my teacher seemed to think different so it puzzled me.

I have focused most it on my work experience and my hobbies as its relevant. I have also mentioned one GCSE subject, Health & Social care, as that is when my first idea of teaching came from which i explained. 

Answered Tue 2nd October, 2012 @ 18:47 by Chloe