A-Level French..yes or no?

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Is it really hard? and I know it'd be worth it but any advice?

Posted: 02-06-12 16:12 by Lizzie Oliver

You are expected to know a lot more about the grammar and not only be able to recognise a lot of it, but also to produce it - eg, the subjunctive mood.

Topic work are about topics which are a lot more interesting. At GCSE, topics include your family, your friends, your hobbies, etc. But at A-Level, topics include youth culture, poverty, immigration, technology, health, alcohol/drugs, Third World, environment, family structure, etc. - topics that show a social understanding of both your own country and France (or a French-speaking country/territory). However, you will be expected to be able to speak about GCSE topics but with a lot more depth.

You start up new things such as translation work, literature and study of history or culture of France or a French-speaking country/territory.

It's very good and if you have a good grasp at French or languages in general, it's quite a pleasant A-Level to do.

Posted: 02-06-12 20:29 by LP-FTW

NO NO NO NO NO - why put yourself through the torture i would be killing myself if i was even considering doing A level French

Posted: 05-06-12 16:36 by NoirRose

I have a genuine interest in languages but i am scared to do the a level. I'm having to teach myself my verbs etc again because i never got taught them and i just guessed through the majority of the gcse 

Posted: 09-06-12 09:49 by Lizzie Oliver

Lizzie Oliver wrote:

I have a genuine interest in languages but i am scared to do the a level. I'm having to teach myself my verbs etc again because i never got taught them and i just guessed through the majority of the gcse 

I was in a similar position to you with A level French (ie: I wasn't formally taught verbs at school for GCSE, I just made them up) and I won't deny it, the AS level year was incredibly challenging as I basically had to teach myself from scratch whereas other people in my class at my new college had had much better teaching at GCSE so they were better prepared. However, if you love languages and are willing to put in the work it is worth it as even if you only do the AS level you will end up with a level of language which is actually useful. I've seen in another thread that you want to teach at primary, and even an AS in a language will allow you to teach that language at school as you'll have the confidence to do it. GCSE level doesn't give you "proper" knowledge of a language to the extent that you can actually use it when you a) go to the country and want to speak to native speakers or b) use it in your career. A level standard of language puts you at a level where you can use the language in both of those situations.

Posted: 11-06-12 13:58 by Emma (admin)

French is such a hard subject to do at A-Level. It involves lots of attention to grammar and vocabulary. The exam I believe is continuously talking about an unknown subject; you get given cards with questions on and sometimes pictures you are asked to describe. However with a good teacher it could be good fun. Also with a language you can organise, and do, work experience abroad, which looks really good on your CV. As it is quite unusual if you did work in another country/language. It is also proven that an A-Level in language can increase your wage, as knowing another language is seen as very good by companies. It depends as well on what you want to be. I hope this was useful :) and good luck in whatever you decide

Posted: 12-06-12 18:04 by OneTooManyAnOpinion