The Working Memory Model

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  • Working Memory Model (WMM)
    • The Central Executive
      • Believed to be the most important part of the model
      • This controls and directs the attention to the suitable component/s
        • Allocates the resources to either the auditoary or visual store
      • Extremely limited capacity and duration
        • Only holds information for a maximum of 2 seconds
    • Visual-spatial Sketchpad
      • Visual Cache
        • Limited capacity
        • Stores visual/spatial info
      • Inner Scribe
        • Rehearsal mechanism for info
    • Phonological Loop
      • Phonological Store (Inner Ear)
        • Has a limited capacity of 1-2 seconds
      • Articulatory Control Process (Inner Voice)
        • Rehearses auditory verbal information from the phonological store
        • Has a short capacity of 1.5 - 2 seconds if not rehearsed
        • Rehearsed subvocally so is remembered
      • Holds spoken info
    • Supporting Evidence
      • Phonological Loop (Research)
        • Baddeley et al
        • Showed one group of Pps 5 one syllable words
          • Correctly recalled more of the shorter words
            • Showed one group of Pps 5 polysyllabic words
        • Showed one group of Pps 5 polysyllabic words
        • Supports the theory that is has a very short capacity and duration
          • Polysyllabic words take longer to rehearse
      • Case Study of KF
        • Recieved brain damage from a motorcycle accident
        • His STM was damaged - only had a digit span of 1
          • Remembered words better if presented visually rather than acoustically
        • Visual-spatial sketchpad separate to phonological loop
    • Limitations of WMM
      • Weaknesses in evidence
        • Many of the key evidence for the WMM comes from case studies into patients with brain damage
          • A brain damaged brain is not normal and does not function the same as a normal brain
          • Researchers can not be sure whether the effected memory is down to damaged brain or if the traumatic accident also contributed

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