4.3.1 - Networks - Wireless Networking

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  • Created by: Annie
  • Created on: 07-05-13 19:59
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  • Wireless Networking
    • What is it?
      • Radio waves are used to communicate between network devices on a LAN
      • The range can be up to 100m but it is dramatically reduced by obstructions such as walls
      • Some WiFi hotspots are available by subscription
      • WiFi networks are sometimes known as WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network)
      • Networks can be open to all, with no encryption
      • Most private homes and businesses use a password which encrypts transmissions on the network
    • What hardware is needed?
      • A broadband enabled telephone line to connect to the internet
      • A wireless modem router is also needed as well as PCs which have wireless network cards
    • How does it work?
      • The modem connects to the telephone line
      • The PC connects to the available network using an encryption password as necessary
      • The PC sends the internet data request as radio waves to the router
      • The router sends the request to the Internet and then broadcasts the reply as radio waves to be picked up by the computer
    • Examples of use
      • Hotspot access to the internet in public locations
        • For laptops and smartphones/PDAs
      • Office use to reduce cabling costs and Health & Safety concerns
      • Factory use to connect different buildings on the same site
      • School use in a laboratory environment and to enable the mobility of students and teachers on a site, maintaining access to ICT and the Internet
    • Advantages
      • Allows networks to be set up quickly
      • Extends range of existing LANs without the need for further cabling
      • Better health and safety - no trailing wires to workstations
      • Cost savings for new workstations as cabling is not needed
      • Communications not affected by cable damage
      • Users can work wherever there is a signal
        • Increased flexibility about where they work
      • The WiFi standard is global so users can use the same laptops in all countries
    • Disadvantages
      • Limited range for wireless communications, further reduced by obstructions
        • Such as walls, buildings etc.
      • Security requires encryption for a private network
      • Health concerns over radio waves
      • Battery life is reduced on mobile devices when wireless connections are in use
  • Potential costs for wireless interface cards to upgrade older devices (usually printers, scanners etc.) and for wireless routers
    • Disadvantages
      • Limited range for wireless communications, further reduced by obstructions
        • Such as walls, buildings etc.
      • Security requires encryption for a private network
      • Health concerns over radio waves
      • Battery life is reduced on mobile devices when wireless connections are in use

Comments

S Joseph

Thank you for the advise!

Mr A Gibson

Number four of four Mind Maps related to networking. This one covers everything you need from a specification about wirelsss networks.

Resource 1 - 4.3.1 - Networks (1) - this resource

Resource 2 - 4.3.1 - Networks - Software Components

Resource 3 - 4.3.1 - Networks - Peer to Peer and Client Server Networks

Resource 4 - 4.3.1 - Networks - Wireless Networking - this resource

 Print these off and stick them on your wall!

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