Wider Reading

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  • Wider Reading Quotes
    • Family love
      • "The children were indeed happily taken off my hands"  Moll Flanders 1722
      • "Man hands on misery to man... Get out and don't have any kids yourself" - This be the Verse - Phillip Larkin - 1971
      • "They fuck you up, your mum and dad" - This Be The Verse - Larkin - 1971
      • "Better thou hadst not been born than not to have pleased me better" - King Lear - Shakespeare - 1606
    • Idealistic love
      • "Can the world buy such a jewel?" Much Ado About Nothing - Shakespeare - 1599
      • "At his lips touch she blossomed for him like a flower" - The Great Gatsby - 1925
      • "When I see a couple of kids and guess the he's fucking her and she's wearing a diaphragm, I know  this is paradise" - High Windows - Philip Larkin - 1974
      • "All heaven... condensed into one eye" - A Face - Robert Browning - 1800s
      • "The bed we loved in was a spinning world" - Anne Hathaway - Duffy - 1999
    • Possessive/ Obsessive love
      • "A sudden blow: the great wings beating still, above the staggering girl"  - Leda and the Swan - W.B. Yeats - 1928
      • "Cone live with me and be my love" - The Passionate Shepherd - Marlowe - 1599
      • "Break, blow, burn and make me new" - Holy Sonnet 14 - John Donne - 1633
      • "I will have her, but I will not keep her long" - Richard III - Shakespeare - 1592
      • "I was dominated, soul, brain, and power, by you" - A Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde - 1890
    • Crazed love
      • "Beloved sweetheart bastard" Havisham - Carol Anne Duffy 1998
      • "Ile fire thy crazed buildings, and enforce the palpal towers to kiss the lowly ground... with slaughtered priests" - Edward II - Christopher Marlowe - 1593
    • Sexual love
      • "An old black ram is tupping your white ewe" Othello - Shakespeare 1603
      • "He sizes women up with a glance" - A Streetcar Named Desire - 1947
      • "He threw me on the bed again; but then he went farther with me than decency permits me to mention" - Moll Flanders - 1722
      • "Wanking ten past three (Surely he's taken her home by now?) The bedroom as hot as a bakery" - Love Again - Phillip Larkin
      • "Dissolved through my so hot desire" - My Love is Like to Ice - Edmund Spenser - 1500s
      • "What a lusty thigh!" - Corinnae Concubitus - Marlowe - 1593
      • "My love is like to ice, and I to fire" - Spenser - 1500s
      • "I burn much more in boiling sweat" - My Love is Like to Ice - Spenser - 1500s
      • "There are things that happen between a man and a woman in the dark - that sort of make everything else seem - unimportant" - A Streetcar Named Desire - Williams - 1948
    • Reductive love
      • "I love him" - Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen 1813
      • "Reader, I married him" - Jane Eyre - 1847
    • Animalistic love
      • Stage directions: "They come together with low, animal moans" - A Streetcar Named Desire - 1947
      • "Animal joy in his being is implicit in all his movements and attitudes" - A Streetcar Named Desire - 1947
      • "Worms shall try that long preserved virginity" - To His Coy Mistress - Christopher Marlowe - 1681
      • "Is it my little squirrel, bustling about ?" A Dolls House - Henrik Ibsen - 1879
      • "She had to lie down there... like an animal" - Lady Chatterley's Lover - D.H. Lawrence - 1928
      • "It is the green eye'd monster  which doth mock the meat it feeds on" - Othello - 1605
      • "The joy of a caged bird was in her voice" - The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde - 1890
    • Love and Hate
      • "Giive not this rotten orange to your friend" - Much Ado About Nothing - 1599
    • Loss of Love
      • "Her left breast swinging loose like a flap" - The Great Gatsby - 1925
      • "All romances end at marriage" - Far From the Madding Crowd - Thomas Hardy - 1874
      • "He was my North, my South, my East, my West" - Funeral Blues - W.H. Auden - 1937
      • "You have killed my love. You used to stir my imagination. Now you don't even stir my curiosity" - The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde - 1890
      • "The smile on your mouth was the deadest thing, alive enough to have strength to die" - Neutral Tones - Thomas Hardy - 1807
      • "It is better to have been left, then never to have been loved" - The Way of the Wolrd - Congreve - 1700s
      • "I hear thy name spoken, and share in its shame" - When We Two Parted - Lord Byron - 1813
      • "And the searchlight which had been turned on the world was turned off again" - A Streetcar Named Desire - Williams - 1947
    • Love and Independence
      • "I am no bird and no net ensnares me" - Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte - 1847
      • "Unsex me here" - Macbeth - 1606
      • Helmer: "no mand would sacrifice his honour for the one he loved" Nora: "It is a thing hundreds of women have done"
    • Separation in Love
      • "Is your heart away or with mine beating?" - Between us Now - Thomas Hardy - 1867
      • "I saw no shadow of another parting from her" Gret Expectations - Charles Dickens - 1860
    • Love and Marriage
      • "Never marry at all, Dorian. Men marry because they are tired; wwomen because they are curious; both are dissapointed" - The Picture of Dorian Gray - 1890
      • Nora: "What do you consider my most sacred duties?" Helmer: "your duties to your husband and your children" - A Dolls House - Ibsen - 1879
      • "What is wit in a wife good for?" - The Country Wife - William Wycherley - 1675
      • "My father and my mother, whose fire from which I cam, has now grown cold?" - One Flesh - Elizabeth Jennings - 1966
    • Eternal love
      • "Only our love hath no decay" - The Anniversary - Donne - 1611
      • "And I will love thee still, my dear, till all the seas gang dry" - O My Luve's Like a Red Red Rose - Robert Birns - 1794
      • "I will kill thee and love thee after" - Othello - 1603
      • "I love thee to the depth and breadth and height my soul can reach" - How Do I Love Thee? - Browning - 1800s
      • "If God choose, I shall but love thee better after death" - How Do I Love Thee? - Browning - 1800s
      • Doctor Rank: "You command me, body and soul" - A Doll's House - Ibsen - 1879
    • Unrequited love
      • Hermia: "The more i hate, the more he follows me" Helena: "the more I love, the more he hateth me"

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