Why there's increased flooding in the UK

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  • Why there’s an increase in flooding in UK
    • Concrete cities
      • Concrete surfaces are almost completely impermeable: rainwater flows off of them and overflows drains
        • More of these concrete cities are being built- sometimes it’s even over land that is permeable, eg over a park with soil that would usually absorb the water
    • Draining marshes
      • Low-lying marshes would act as a temporary basin to absorb excess water at times of flooding- however, these marshes are being cleared for agricultural use
        • This means excess water overruns into surrounding areas and flooding occurs
    • Woodland to farmland
      • Woodland soil is very absorbent and tree roots/decaying plant material usually enables water to seep into bedrock
        • However, this soil has been converted into compacted soil for farmland which has reduced the ground’s ability to hold excess water; increasing surface run-off
          • Increasing amounts of woodland have begun to be built on, decreasing the water absorbed by woodland soil and increasing surface run-off/flood risk
    • Homing on Floodplains
      • Floodplains are part of river system: excess water drains into the floodplain at times of flooding and is held there until river levels subside
        • Nevertheless, an increase in demand for new homes has meant land developers have begun to build on floodplains(due to the unavailability of space) which puts people directly in harm’s way at times of flooding
    • Climate Change
  • However, this soil has been converted into compacted soil for farmland which has reduced the ground’s ability to hold excess water; increasing surface run-off
    • Increasing amounts of woodland have begun to be built on, decreasing the water absorbed by woodland soil and increasing surface run-off/flood risk

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