Why was medicine so slow to change during the Renaissance?

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Why was medicine so slow to change during the Renaissance?
    • Andreas Versalius
      • What did he discover?
        • That the human jaw bone is made from one bone, not two as Galen said.
        • The breastbone has three parts, not seven as Galen said.
        • Blood doesn't flow into the heart through invisible holes in the septum
        • He printed books and it helped him to have such a big impact
    • William Harvey
      • Who was he?
        • A London doctor
      • Impact on medicine and health
        • Harvey's discoveries laid out stepping stones for future investigations of blood and physiology. Surgery couldn't of developed without him.
      • What did he discover?
    • Were everyday treatments changing?
      • New ingredients
        • Rhubarb from Asia used to purge bowels
        • European travels to America and Asia for new ingrediants
      • A school boy at Eaton collage said in 1655 he was beaten for not smoking enough. Because tobacco was used  as a prevention for plague.
    • Physicians and their training
      • Man vs. women
        • Women weren't allowed to attend university so could not become physicians. They continued to work as midwives, but even this came under threat.
      • William Hunter
        • A London doctor. Emphasised importance of careful observation of patient's symptoms and of experimenting to test treatments, not just accepting what they read in books.
    • The growth of science
      • More people had books in their homes containing advice on herbal remedies
      • A fellowship of many of the world's most eminent scientists

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar resources:

See all resources »