Was the Weimar Republic Doomed from the Start?

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  • Was the Weimar Republic Doomed From the Start?
    • How Did Germany Emerge From Defeat in WWI?
      • The Weimar Government
        • The Reichsrat
          • Upper House - could delay measures passed by the Reichstag
        • The Reichstag
          • The new German Parliament
            • Elected by Proportional Representation
        • The President
          • Frederick Ebert
      • The Impact of the War on Germany
        • Virtually bankrupt
          • War left 600,000 widows and 2 million children without fathers
            • By 1925 the state was spending about 1/3 of its budget on war pensions
          • National income was about 1/3 of what it had been in 1913
          • Industrial production was about 2/3 of what it had been in 1913
        • Unstable revolution and became a republic
          • Stresses of war led to a revolution Oct-Nov 1918
            • The Weimar Government
              • The Reichsrat
                • Upper House - could delay measures passed by the Reichstag
              • The Reichstag
                • The new German Parliament
                  • Elected by Proportional Representation
              • The President
                • Frederick Ebert
          • Many ex-soldiers and civilians despised the new Republic  as they believed the old hero FM Hindenburg had been betrayed
        • Deepened divisions within German society
          • Huge gaps between living standards of rich and poor
          • During the war women were called up to work in factories - many saw this as damaging to traditional family values and society as a whole
          • Many German workers were bitter about their poor pay during the war while factory owners made fortunes
    • What Were the Economic and Political Impacts of the Treaty of Versailles on the Weimar Republic?
      • Reasons for Discontent
        • Thousands of people were poor and starving
        • Many Germans denied that they had lost the war and blamed the 'November Criminals'
          • Communists
          • Government
          • Jews
        • TTOV had made living conditions worse - the government was seen as weak and ineffective
      • The Threat From the Left
        • 1919 - The Spartacists Revolt
          • Led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg
          • Tried to  take over Berlin
            • Defeated by a vigilante force of Communist-hating ex-soldiers
              • The Freikorps
        • 1919 - Bavarian Uprising
          • Socialist ally of Ebert, Kurt Eisner, murdered
            • Communists declared soviet republic in Bavaria
              • Revolt was crushed
                • The Freikorps
      • The Threat From the Right
        • 1920 - The Kapp Putsch
          • Dr W. Kapp led 5,000 Freikorps into Berlin
            • Army refused to fire - it seemed the Weimar was doomed
              • General strike brought Berlin to a halt
                • Kapp realised he couldn't win and fled
        • 1922 - Rathenau Assassination
          • Foreign minister Rathenau was assassinated by extremists
            • He was Jewish
      • 1923 - The Ruhr
        • Germany couldn't pay reparations
          • French and Belgian troops occupied the industrial area
            • Took what was owed to them in the form of raw materials and goods
              • Government ordered general strike so there would be no goods to take
                • Hyperinflation
                  • What Were the Economic and Political Impacts of the Treaty of Versailles on the Weimar Republic?
                    • Reasons for Discontent
                      • Thousands of people were poor and starving
                      • Many Germans denied that they had lost the war and blamed the 'November Criminals'
                        • Communists
                        • Government
                        • Jews
                      • TTOV had made living conditions worse - the government was seen as weak and ineffective
                    • The Threat From the Left
                      • 1919 - The Spartacists Revolt
                        • Led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg
                        • Tried to  take over Berlin
                          • Defeated by a vigilante force of Communist-hating ex-soldiers
                        • 1919 - Bavarian Uprising
                          • Socialist ally of Ebert, Kurt Eisner, murdered
                            • Communists declared soviet republic in Bavaria
                              • Revolt was crushed
                        • The Threat From the Right
                          • 1920 - The Kapp Putsch
                            • Dr W. Kapp led 5,000 Freikorps into Berlin
                              • Army refused to fire - it seemed the Weimar was doomed
                                • General strike brought Berlin to a halt
                                  • Kapp realised he couldn't win and fled
                          • 1922 - Rathenau Assassination
                            • Foreign minister Rathenau was assassinated by extremists
                              • He was Jewish
                        • 1923 - The Ruhr
                          • Germany couldn't pay reparations
                            • French and Belgian troops occupied the industrial area
                              • Took what was owed to them in the form of raw materials and goods
                                • Government ordered general strike so there would be no goods to take
                                  • Hyperinflation
                                    • Production could not keep up with currency
                                    • Wages were payed twice a day before prices went up again
                                    • Middle Classes suffered as savings became worthless
                      • Production could not keep up with currency
                      • Wages were payed twice a day before prices went up again
                      • Middle Classes suffered as savings became worthless
        • To What Extent Did the Weimar Recover after 1923?
          • Gustav Stresemann
            • September 1923 - tells workers in the Ruhr to go back to work
              • 1925 - French and Belgian troops left the Ruhr
            • 1924 - the Dawes Plan
              • USA lends money to Germany
                • Germany pays back France and Britain
                  • Britain and France pay debts back to the USA
                    • USA lends money to Germany
                      • Germany pays back France and Britain
                        • Britain and France pay debts back to the USA
              • Oct 1925 - agreed Locarno Treaties
                • Western borders of Germany agreed
                  • He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts
              • 1926 - Germany joined the League of Nations
              • 1928 - Germany was one of 65 countries to sign to Kelogg-Briand Pact
              • 1929 - the Young Plan replaces Dawes Plan
                • Reparations reduced by 3/4 and Germany had 59 years to pay them
          • What Were the Achievements of the Weimar Period?
            • Culture
              • Berlin became an international centre for culture
              • Advances in art, architecture, music and literature
                • Fritz Lang - successful German film director
              • New and Bold developments
                • Drama of Bertolt Brecht
                • Bauhaus School of Design
              • Weimar Republic encourages critical thinking
                • Frankfurt University
            • To What Extent Did the Weimar Recover after 1923?
              • Gustav Stresemann
                • September 1923 - tells workers in the Ruhr to go back to work
                  • 1925 - French and Belgian troops left the Ruhr
                • 1924 - the Dawes Plan
                  • Oct 1925 - agreed Locarno Treaties
                    • Western borders of Germany agreed
                      • He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts
                  • 1926 - Germany joined the League of Nations
                  • 1928 - Germany was one of 65 countries to sign to Kelogg-Briand Pact
                  • 1929 - the Young Plan replaces Dawes Plan
                    • Reparations reduced by 3/4 and Germany had 59 years to pay them

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