Video Terminology

A lot of typing and I most likely missed a lot of the terminology.

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  • Created by: Kelly
  • Created on: 23-09-14 12:36
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  • Video Terminology
    • Visual codes
      • Camera-work
        • Camera-work (in depth)
          • Establishing shot
            • Establishes a location or a situation from being high-up and looking down over an area
              • Can be a shot of an iconic location or image that the audience recognises so understanding where they are
          • Long-shot
            • Taken from a distance
              • Used to convey a sense of space or to locate action in a specific place
                • You will be able to see the whole body of the character
          • Medium shot
            • Taken from the waist-up
          • Close-up
            • Closely frames a person, object or an aspect of action
            • Extreme close-up
              • Frames a very specific feature or object for emphasis
          • Aerial Shot
            • Taken from directly above an object looking straight down
          • High-angle
            • Camera is angled so that it looks down on subject
              • Makes subject appear small with  no or little power
            • Low-angle shot
              • Camera angled so that it looks up at subject.
                • Gives the subject a dominating and powerful look.
          • Eye-level shot
            • Camera is level with the eye-line of the subject.
          • Two-shot
            • Two Subjects are in the frame - usually at a medium distance
          • Panning shot
            • Camera is locked in position and moves from left to right vice versa
      • Mise-en-scene
        • Lighting
        • Costume
        • Setting/location
    • Camera-work (in depth)
      • Establishing shot
        • Establishes a location or a situation from being high-up and looking down over an area
          • Can be a shot of an iconic location or image that the audience recognises so understanding where they are
      • Long-shot
        • Taken from a distance
          • Used to convey a sense of space or to locate action in a specific place
            • You will be able to see the whole body of the character
      • Medium shot
        • Taken from the waist-up
      • Close-up
        • Closely frames a person, object or an aspect of action
        • Extreme close-up
          • Frames a very specific feature or object for emphasis
      • Aerial Shot
        • Taken from directly above an object looking straight down
      • High-angle
        • Camera is angled so that it looks down on subject
          • Makes subject appear small with  no or little power
        • Low-angle shot
          • Camera angled so that it looks up at subject.
            • Gives the subject a dominating and powerful look.
      • Eye-level shot
        • Camera is level with the eye-line of the subject.
      • Two-shot
        • Two Subjects are in the frame - usually at a medium distance
      • Panning shot
        • Camera is locked in position and moves from left to right vice versa
    • Camera-work (more...)
      • POV shot
        • Camera acts like the eyes of the subject and shows the action through their perpespective
      • Over-the shoulder shot
        • Commonly used in dialogue scenes
      • 180* Rule
        • The imagery line that must not be crossed in order to maintain continuity  and not cause confusion for the audience
          • Shot//reverse shot
            • Commonly used to abide the 180*
              • Used in dialogue scenes using two 'over the shoulder' shots
      • Static shot
        • Camera kept still + focused on an unmoving subject
          • Used to allow a scene to unfold before us  to seemly unfold naturally
      • Tracking shot
        • Camera itself is moved
          • Often taken from the side of a subject
      • Hand-held
        • Camera is clearly being hand operated and not steadied by a tri-pod etc
      • Focus
        • Objects are in clear focus
          • Also known as 'depth of focus'
            • Shallow Focus
              • Deep Focus
                • Developed by Orson Welles
                  • Both foreground and bg are in focus simutaneously
              • Foreground is in focus, bg is out of focus

Comments

maddiekirton

Really useful, thanks!!!! :D

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