United Nations Rights of thw Child

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  • United Nations Convention on Every Child Matters
    • The year 1989, convention was on how to upkeep the rights of the child, the rights to be clean and healthy and loved by their parents or carers.
      • The documentation of this convention was published in the form of a treaty and is one of the most successful treaties in history, all made possible by UNICEF.
    • 54 articles that cover all aspects of a child’s life and set out the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights that all children everywhere are entitled to.
      • It also explains how adults and governments must work together to make sure all children can enjoy all their rights.
    • The Convention changed the way children are viewed and treated as human beings with a distinct set of rights instead of as passive objects of care and charity.
      • This Convention was a turnijng poin tin history as before this happened children weren't viewed as vunerable and were required to
      • These rights describe what a child needs to survive, grow, They apply equally to every child, no matter who they are or where they come from.
      • All children have rights, even those affected by conflict or emergencies, like the recent earthquake in Nepal.
    • The Convention must be seen as a whole: all the rights are linked and no right is more important that another.
      • There are four articles in the Convention that are seen as special in that they help interpret all other articles, playing a fundamental role in realising all the rights in the Convention for all children. They are called general principles.
  • There are four articles in the Convention that are seen as special in that they help interpret all other articles, playing a fundamental role in realising all the rights in the Convention for all children. They are called general principles.

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