Types of microorganisms

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  • Types of Micro-organisms
    • Fungus
      • Microbe - Athlete's Foot
        • Spread - Contact
          • Reduce infection risk by avoiding direct contact in areas where spores are likely to be present e.g. wear flip flops in changing rooms / swimming pools
    • Virus
      • Microbe - Mumps
        • Spread - Airborne (droplet infection)
          • Prevented my MMR vaccination
      • Microbe - Measles
        • Spread - Airborne (droplet infection) or by contact
          • Prevented my MMR vaccination
      • Microbe - Colds and Flu
        • Spread - Airborne (droplet infection)
          • Flu vaccination for targeted groups
      • Microbe - Rubella
        • Spread - Airborne (droplet infection) through coughing and sneezing
          • Prevented my MMR vaccination
      • Polio
        • Spread - Usually spread through drinking water or contaminated with faeces
          • The polio vaccination has currently eradicated polio in the UK
      • Microbe - HIV which leads to AIDS
        • Spread - Exchange of body fluids during sex / Infected blood
          • Using a condom will reduce risk of infection, as will drug addicts not sharing needles.
            • No cure
    • Bacterium
      • Microbe - Tuberculosis
        • Spread - Airborne (droplet infection)
          • BCG vaccination
            • If contracted, treatment with drugs including antibiotics
      • Microbe - Salmonella (food poisoning)
        • Spread - from contaminated food
          • Always cooking food thoroughly and not mixing cooked and uncooked foods can control spread
          • Treatment by antibiotics
      • Microbe - Chlamydia
        • Spread - Sexual contact
          • Untitled
      • Microbe - Gonorrhoea
        • Spread - sexual contact
          • Using a condom will reduce risk of infection
            • Treatment by antibiotics

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