Summary of Rebellions

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Tudor History
    • Yorkshire Rebellion 1489
      • Taxes were agreed in parliament to pay for a war against France to save Brittany's independence
      • The Earl of Northumberland was murdered when he tried to collect the tax
      • Led by Sir John Egremont, the rebels marched to York
      • The harvest in 1488 was poor
      • The earl of Surrey was sent with an army to crush the rebellion
    • Cornish Rebellion 1497
      • Perkin Warbeck was welcomed by King James IV of Scotland as King Richard IV of England
      • Parliament voted a subsidy to prepare England for a Scottish invasion
      • Led by Thomas Flamanck. Michael Joseph and Lord Audley, 18,000 rebels marched to London
      • The Rebels were defeated by a royal army at the Battle of Blackheath
      • Henry VII had imposed new regulations on the Stannary Parliament
    • Tax Revolt 1513
      • People in Yorkshire and Durham refused to play a poll tax.
    • Amicable Grant 1525
      • King Francis I of France has been captured by soldiers of Emperor Charles V
      • Henry VIII wanted additional funds to fight a war against France, but parliament refused to grant a subsidy.
      • Cardinal Wolsey proposed a forced loan
      • 10,000 people gathered in Lavenha and Bury St. Edmonds in Suffolk to protest
      • People refused to pay the tax in Cambridgeshire, Essex, Sussex and Warwickshire
      • When the Dukes of Norfold and Suffolk investigated the scale of the rebellion, Henry followed advice and stopped the collect of the amicable grant
      • All protestors were pardoned
    • Lincolnshire Rising 1536 & Pilgrimage of Grace 1536-7
      • 10,000 people from across the county, including 18 members of the gentry, were involved
      • Protesters gathered at Louth to protect the parish church from the King's Commissioner
      • In order to divorce Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII had broken with the Catholic Church in Rome, Religious reforms had followed.
      • Catherine of Aragon's daughter, Mary, a catholic, had been replaced in the oder of succession by Anne Bleyn;'s daughter Elizabeth
      • The dissolution of the monasteries had begun
      • The Statute of Uses had closed a loophole which had allowed people inheriting land to avoid paying taxes
      • The rebels were hostile to the King's advisers  Thomas Cromwell and Richard Riche
      • People believed a rumour that taxes were to be levied on people who owned livestock
      • A royal army, led by the Duke of Suffolk, arrived and the protestors dispersed
      • Uprsings spread to Yorkshire, Nortumberland and Durham
      • Led by Robert Aske, the rebels, now numbering 30,000 seized York and Hull
      • The pontefract Artcles were devised and sent to the King
      • The Duke of Norfolk met with the rebels and offered them a general pardon, a promise that parliament would meet to discuss their demands and an agreement that the dissolution of the monasteries would be delayed until parliament had debated the issue.
      • Sir Francis Bigod raised a fresh rebellionaround Hull and then fled to Cumberland, where the people rose in his support
      • The Duke of Norfolk led an army to crush the rebellion
      • The leaders of the Pilgrimage were rounded up and executed for treason
    • Western Rebellion 1549
      • William Body, a king's commissioner, carried out religious reforms and investigated churches with determination and ruthlessness. He was murdered in Cornwall in 1548
      • The 1549 Act of Uniformity imposed a new, Protestant form of worship on all churches in England
      • A rebel camp was set up at Bodmin in Cornwall
      • At Sampford Courtenay in Devon parishioners refused to allow their priest to use the new form of woship
      • Rebels from Devon and Cornwall laid siege to Exeter
      • An army led by Lord Russell defeated the rebels
    • Kett's Rebellion 1549
      • In 1548 a royal commission was set up to examine the legality of enclosures in the Midlands and Protector Somerset issues a proclamation condemning enclosures
      • Drunken mobs attacked the enclosures of John Flowerdew and Robert Kett at Wymondham
      • The rebels were defeated at the Battle of Dussindale by the Earl of Warwick's army
      • Rebel demands included the roper imposition of religiousreforms
      • 16,000 rebels set up camp on Mousehold Heath outside Norwich, which they later occupied
    • Wyatt's Rebellion 1554
      • Queen Mary I proposed to marry King Phillip II of Spain
      • When Edward VI died attempts were made to secure a protestant succession by declaring Lady Jane Grey to be queen. It failed and she was imprisoned in the Tower. Mary, Henry VIII's daughter by Catherine of Aragon, became Queen.
      • The religious reforms of Henry VIII and Edward VI were undone
      • A rebellion was planned in four different counties, but rumours about the rebellion leaked out at court and the rebels had to act before they were ready
      • Sir Thomas Wyatt persuaded 3000 men in Kent to join him
      • The rebels marched to London. There was little royal response, but delays in crossing the Thames enabled the people of London to mount resistance.
    • The Revolt of the Northern Earls 1569
      • Queen Elizabeth reintroduced Protestantism via settlement that made the new church acceptable to the majority
      • In 1668 Mary Queen of Scots arrived in England, having been forced to abdicate her throne in Scotland. She was a descendant of Henry VII and next in line for the throne of England. She was also catholic
      • The Earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland were catholic. They had lost influence to younger men at court
      • The rebellion had support in North Yorkshire and Northumberland. The rebels attacked the Bishop of Durham and destroyed all signs of Protestantismin Durham Cathedral
      • A royal army was sent north and eventually the rebellion was defeated on the Scottish border. The leaders were executed
    • 1590s
      • The effects of population growth and poor harvests led to protests about the price of bread and attacks on enclosures
      • People who were believed to be profiting from the distress of the masses were attacked
      • Curfews and other restrictions were introduced to curb people's power to protest. As a deterrent, more people were executed for rioting.
    • The Earl of Essex's Rebellion 1601
      • The Earl of Essex had been Elizabeth's favourite courtier. He was made Lord Lieutenant in Ireland in 1599. He failed to stop a rebellion in Ulster; acted against the queen's wishes and then abandoned his past. He was disgraced.
      • The refusal of the crown to renew his right to collect taxes on the import of sweet wine led to severe financial difficulties
      • With 300 supporters  many of them noblemen in a similar financial plight, Essex marched into London. There was little popular support and the rebellion was crushed. Essex was executed
      • Essex aimed to seize control of London, remove Robert Cecil from office and win the favor of James VI of Scotland, who was next in line to the English Throne

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all resources »