To his Coy Mistress

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  • Created by: Aislinn
  • Created on: 07-04-13 12:17
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  • To his Coy Mistress
    • About
      • The poet is telling the women that he would love to love her and flatter her with gifts but there isn't time. He says that they should enjoy each other whilst they are young/ attractive, so tries to persuade her using various arguements
    • Feelings and attitudes
      • Impatience- He doesn't want to have a long courtship of her
      • Urgency- Time is moving on and he feels that they need to enjoy being together now
      • Reluctance- From the increasing frustration he shows, it appears that shes unwilling to have sex with him
    • Personal Response
      • What impression does the phrase 'vegetable love' give about his feelings? He has no feelings towards her all he wants to do is have sex with her
      • How much do we find out about the mistress and her thoughts and feelings? We know she's a shy lady who is not willing to sleep with him as he's rude and is just very horny.
      • Is there  any evidence in the poem that the mistress is really modest, or just playing hard to get? There is evidence of both at first she is modest but towards the end she is playing hard to get.
      • Some people argue that the narrator of the poem is losing his temper, others say that he is making a well- ordered argument. I don't think he is losing his temper as in the last paragraph he is pushing her but not aggressively and no punctuation indicates this.
    • Comparison
      • The farmers bride/ Sonnet 116/ Harmonium/ In Paris with you/ Born Yesterday/ Hour
  • Personal Response
    • What impression does the phrase 'vegetable love' give about his feelings? He has no feelings towards her all he wants to do is have sex with her
    • How much do we find out about the mistress and her thoughts and feelings? We know she's a shy lady who is not willing to sleep with him as he's rude and is just very horny.
    • Is there  any evidence in the poem that the mistress is really modest, or just playing hard to get? There is evidence of both at first she is modest but towards the end she is playing hard to get.
    • Some people argue that the narrator of the poem is losing his temper, others say that he is making a well- ordered argument. I don't think he is losing his temper as in the last paragraph he is pushing her but not aggressively and no punctuation indicates this.

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