Theories of Anxiety

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  • Theories of Anxiety
    • Cognitive trait anxiety
      • This is when a player feels nerves before most games and could simply be part of the player's genetic make-up.
        • Trait anxiety is displayed before all competitions, regardless of the importance of the event and the possibility of winning.
          • The athlete feels nerves every time.
            • This tendency to become anxious in all competitions is known as trait anxiety.
    • Competitive state anxiety
      • Competitive state anxiety is more temporary and is a response to a particular moment in a game or a specific sporting situaition.
        • For example, when taking a penalty in hockey, the weight of responsibility is on the penalty-taker and this temporary increase in anxiety could affect the outcome unless the nerves are controlled.
          • The amount of state anxiety experienced can vary throughout the game, it could be high at the start and reduce during the action.
            • Competitive state anxiety can also depend on the mood of the individual.
    • The link between trait and state:
      • An individual with high trait anxiety is likely to experience high state anxiety when faced with a stressful situation.
        • If you have trait then you are more likely to get state!!
          • Psychologist Rainer Martens established the link between state and trait when establishing the Sports Competitive Anxiety Test (****)
            • The link between trait and state:
              • An individual with high trait anxiety is likely to experience high state anxiety when faced with a stressful situation.
                • If you have trait then you are more likely to get state!!
                  • Psychologist Rainer Martens established the link between state and trait when establishing the Sports Competitive Anxiety Test (****)

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