The Sun Rising

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  • The Sun Rising
    • first two stanzas start with a question
      • "why dost thou...call on us?"
      • "thou beams so reverend and strong,/ Why shouldest thou think?"
        • why are you so powerful? is he asking the point of it? or about self worth?
    • the sun is a pestering disturbance
      • "Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide/ Late schoolboys and Sour prentices/ Go tell court huntsmen the king will ride, / call country ants"
        • no discrimination - sun effects everyone and is associated with negative everyday actions
        • listing
          • Death be not Proud
          • A Nocturnal
      • Busy old fool, unruly Sun
        • almost as if telling off a naughty child
        • aubade , two lovers reflecting
        • direct and petulant
          • begins with a trochee
            • second last line also: "shine here to us"
        • "Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide/ Late schoolboys and Sour prentices/ Go tell court huntsmen the king will ride, / call country ants"
          • no discrimination - sun effects everyone and is associated with negative everyday actions
          • listing
            • Death be not Proud
            • A Nocturnal
        • begins with a trochee
          • second last line also: "shine here to us"
    • Donne's power/superiority over the sun
      • 'I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink'
        • the brevity of wink - who really has more power...
      • Thou sun art half as happy'as we
        • Donne challenges the sun's importance
        • is he saying personal love is more important than power?
      • "thy duties be/ To warm the world, that's done in warming us"
        • Donne concludes with the idea that although the sun is vital - it is still serving human needs
      • This bed thy centre is, these walls, thy sphere
        • Donne concludes with the idea that although the sun is vital - it is still serving human needs
        • Donne is at least more superior than the rest of the world
        • we're the sun, our warmth - the light of our relationship
        • their bed is the core of warmth - the reason the sun rotates
      • Donne and his lady are the centre of the universe
        • "both the Indias of spice and mine/ Be where thou left'st them, or lie here with me"
          • everything moves to them and their bed
        • "She's all states, and all princes I,/ Nothing else is."
          • power over her combined with the conclusive brevity of nothing else is
          • "Princes do but play us"
            • Donne defies natural authority
            • despite Donne's male sexuality over powering her- their image is one
      • Carol Rumens: he restores the medieval concept of the heavens, in which the Earth rules supreme
        • Carol Rumens: These hints of "scenery" are like windows in the hyperbole: they are glimpses of reality
        • line 1,5 and 6 = iambic tetrameter the rest are iambic pentameter.

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