The policing of the peace: use of chambres mi-parties, garrison towns

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • The policing of the peace: use of chambres mi-parties, garrison towns
    • chambres mi parties (bipartisian courts) were established in the parlements to judge lawsuits involving protestants.
    • commisioners appointed to ensure that the edict was carried out on the ground
    • protestants granted military and political independance - towns garrisoned by troops (annual royal payments.)
      • states dependant on royal favour and finance
      • surposedly temporary
      • opposition from parlements
      • surety towns and assemblies effectively undermined royal authority and caused friction.
    • france tired of war -had to create unity and appease both confessional groups.
    • law and order had largely broken down in localities, (SW - local nobles had become a law unto themselves, raising tax, large interest rates on loans)
    • Sully restored the financial independance of the crown and rebuilt the country's economic infrastructure.
    • last decade of HIV's reign -economic recovery in France and Europe - relative peace in international affairs
    • previsous role as calvanist protector made Huguenots more tolerant to Henry.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all resources »