The nature of relationships in different cultures

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  • The nature of relationships in different cultures
    • Gross's belief of culture; there are two aspects
      • objective aspects
        • buildings, pictures, music and food
      • subjective aspects
        • beliefs , values and social norms
    • arranged marriages
      • Batabyal
        • researched the premises of  arranged marriages
          • young people are unlikely to make the right choice
          • young people will be persuaded by attraction which is unlikely to produce a stable relationship
      • Zaidi et al
        • studied the views of 2nd or 3rd generation Pakistani or Muslim women
        • most favoured the western practises for love
        • many perceived their fathers to be resistant to change
      • modern arranged marriages
        • Umaderi et al
          • compared views on marriage of professional and non- professional women
          • both groups were unhappy about the idea of an arranged marriage
          • the preferred the western love marriage
            • but it was still important that their family approved
      • success
        • Gupta and singh
          • compared love and liking in arranged and love marriages
          • studies 100 professional, degree educated women
            • 50 had arranged marriages
            • 50 had love marriages
            • matched pairs design
          • in love marriages both love and liking was higher at the start
            • decreased over time
          • in arranged marriages love and liking started low but increased
            • after ten years exceeded the love in love marriages
      • Moore and leung
        • compared 212 Anglo Australian students to 100 Chinese- Australian students
          • 61% anglo-australian students were in a romantic relationship
          • 38% Chinese Australian's were in a romantic relationship
          • more likely in the western culture but isn't unheard of in a collectivist culture
        • wanted to see the 'romantic' conservatism of Chinese students would affect their romantic styles
      • Epstein
        • divorce rates are lower and most report that they've fallen in love with each other
      • myers et al
        • found not diiference in marital satisfaction
    • the importance of love in western relationships
      • Levine 1995
        • asked participants If they'd marry someone if they were an ideal partner but they didn't love them
        • 11 different countries
        • 14% in individualist cultures would
        • 34% in Thailand, a collectivist culture
          • love is a comparative luxury
      • loneliness
        • seepersad
          • young adults in the UK were more likely to feel lonely due to a norm of being in a relationship
          • US had the highest levels
          • Korean teens relied on family for social networking while US teens relied on friends
      • relationships as an economic alliance
        • in some cultures relationships take part within negotiation and economic transaction
        • process of a dowry was common in the UK till late 19th century
        • lee et al
          • looked into the different attitudes towards the practise of dowries in india
          • dowries are becoming more popular
          • out of the 4000 women studied 2/3 disapproved the dowry system
    • cultural bias
      • presenting an etic as a emic
      • indigenous psychologies
        • suggested by kim and berry
        • used to ensure researchers don't treat their culture as the norm
          • this way we can study aspects of relationships that are seen as important and meaningful within a culture

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