The Kidneys

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  • The Kidneys
    • Structure
      • Most people have two.
      • Positioned on each side of the spine.
      • Supplied with blood from the Renal Artery.
      • Drained by the Renal Vein.
      • The urine passes out of the kidney down the ureter to the bladder.
      • In the longitudinal section, we can see that the kidney consists of easily identifiable regions surrounded by a capsule.
        • In the centre is the pelvis which leads to the ureter
        • The inner region is called the medulla
        • The outer region is called the cortex
    • The Role of the Kidneys
      • The role of the kidneys is to remove waste from the blood and to produce urine.
    • The Nephron
      • The bulk of each kidney is made up of tiny tubules called nephrons.
      • There are about 1 million nephrons in each kidney.
      • The nephrons are closely associated with many tiny blood capillaries.
      • Each nephron starts in the cortex
        • In the cortex the capillaries form a knot called the glomerulus
        • This (glomerulus) is surrounded by a cup shaped structure called the Bowman's capsule
  • In the longitudinal section, we can see that the kidney consists of easily identifiable regions surrounded by a capsule.
    • In the centre is the pelvis which leads to the ureter
    • The inner region is called the medulla
    • The outer region is called the cortex
  • Fluid from the blood is pushed into the Bowman's Capsule by the process of ultrafiltration
    • Each nephron starts in the cortex
      • In the cortex the capillaries form a knot called the glomerulus
      • This (glomerulus) is surrounded by a cup shaped structure called the Bowman's capsule
    • The capsule leads into the nephron which is divided into four parts
      • Proximal Convoluted Tube
      • Distal Convoluted Tube
      • Loop of Henle
      • Collecting Duct

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