The Hindenburg Programme

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  • THE HINDENBURG PROGRAMME
    • This marked the beginning of TOTAL WAR!
    • AIM: to compensate for Germany's lack of raw materials by introducing greater efficiencies and drive.
      • All of Germany's non-essential industries were to be shut down as all resources would be mobilised for War.
    • The process of rationalisation to transform the German War economy was to be done through administrative rationalisation and far tighter control of labour.
      • New War Minister, Hermann con Stein, was to assure overall control of economic mobilisation.
      • The Supreme War Office was created by General Groener to oversee the process of economic mobilisation.
      • The Auxiliary Labour Law, approved by the Reichstag in December 1916, was a central pillar of the programme.
        • The aim of this Law was to mobilise all available male-labour for the War Effort.
        • It was a significant turning-point...
          • All males between 17 and 60 had to work or the War Effort if needed.
          • Gesture to the Trade Unions: the right to collective bargaining was granted!
            • Union officials sat on boards that designated workers to factories.
            • Arbitration boards were set up to mediate disputes in companies of 50+ employees.
              • Considerable gestures as the army had previously taken a strong anti-union stance.
                • Union officials sat on boards that designated workers to factories.
          • BUT...
            • MOST GERMANS WERE NOT DECEIVED!
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    • OUTCOME!
      • THE HINDENBURG PROGRAMME FAILED TO PROVIDE THE REQUIRED EFFICIENCY.
        • The Auxiliary Labour Law failed to mobilise large numbers of extra men as THEY DID NOT EXIST.
        • The Hindenburg Programme placed an even greater strain on the already stretched supply of raw materials due to it increasing the demand for the production of munitions.
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