Family and Households - The Family, Social Structure and Social Change...

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  • Created by: Ben
  • Created on: 25-11-12 12:15
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  • The Family, Social Structure and Social Change...
    • Defining the 'family'
      • Murdock (1949)- focused on the nuclear family structure.
        • Nuclear family: a stereotypical two-generation family made up of a heterosexual couple with dependent offspring.
          • Right Wing Sociologists agree.
          • Statistical norm...a nuclear family should...
            • share a common residence
              • marriage should be companionate and share roles.
                • sexual division of labour = men - breadwinner and women - nurturers and childcare.
            • have a  small compact structure
              • share a common residence
                • marriage should be companionate and share roles.
                  • sexual division of labour = men - breadwinner and women - nurturers and childcare.
            • parents should be married and have had children through love for one another.
            • immediate family comes first - kinship
    • The traditional view of the family
      • constitute a powerful conservative ideology
        • lone parents are not as effective as having two parents
          • homosexual couples should not have the same fertility rights as a heterosexual couple.
            • constitute a powerful conservative ideology
              • lone parents are not as effective as having two parents
                • homosexual couples should not have the same fertility rights as a heterosexual couple.
      • Functionalism, the social structure and the family
        • Murdock (1949)- focused on the nuclear family structure.
          • Nuclear family: a stereotypical two-generation family made up of a heterosexual couple with dependent offspring.
            • Right Wing Sociologists agree.
            • Statistical norm...a nuclear family should...
              • have a  small compact structure
                • parents should be married and have had children through love for one another.
                • immediate family comes first - kinship
          • functionalism is a structural theory that believes the social structure of society is responsible for shaping individuals and life chances.
            • functionalists are interested in how families function in society.
        • Functionalism and the evolution of the family
          • Functionalism, the social structure and the family
            • functionalism is a structural theory that believes the social structure of society is responsible for shaping individuals and life chances.
              • functionalists are interested in how families function in society.
          • Parsons (1965) - examined the influence of industrialisation and the economy on family structures and relationships
            • pre-industrial societies based on extended kinship networks - e.g. live and work along side with cousins
              • home and work were the same thing
            • roles within the family were based on aspiration rather than achievement
              • roles were passed down through generations
                • duty and obligation to accept these roles
                  • home and work were the same thing
          • extended families performed other functions for their members
            • pre-industrial societies based on extended kinship networks - e.g. live and work along side with cousins
              • skills and education
                • maintain health
                  • provide welfare
                    • pursue justice for family
              • maintain health
                • provide welfare
                  • pursue justice for family
          • The effects of industrialisation
            • economy demanded a geographically mobile workforce meant that nuclear families had to move away from extended kin in search of job opportunities
            • Parsons related industrialisation to changes in family structure.
              • economy demanded a geographically mobile workforce meant that nuclear families had to move away from extended kin in search of job opportunities
            • nuclear families became isolated and therefore had no economic or social support from extended kin, they became more home centred and more focused on each other.
              • Parsons related industrialisation to changes in family structure.
              • 'structural differentiation' - families became less important as an agency of production
                • new roles for husband and wife - women now 'expressive leader' more to do withsocialization of children and childcare, men - 'instrumental leader' responsible for economic welfare and assets
                • Critcisims of Parsons view.
                  • Maxist
                    • nuclear family as serving the ruling class and promotes capitalism
                    • ideological apparatus
                    • working class families are forced to pursue 'false needs' of consumerism
                    • capitalism has discouraged extended nuclear families because of the mutual support system it offers.
                  • Maxist-Feminist
                    • focus on the roles between men and women
                      • unpaid work contributes to capitalist economies
                      • capitalism exploits women and men benefit from this
                      • women provide emotional support for men when they are frustrated
                        • domestic violence
                  • Radical-Femenist
                    • women were excluded from work and therefore dependent on the male breadwinner
                    • the emergence of the modern nuclear family meets the men rather than other members of society

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