The evolutionary perspective - Bowlby's theory

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  • The evolutionary perspective - Bowlby's theory
    • Three important features
      • Infants and carers are 'programmed to become attached.
      • As attachment is a biological process, it takes place during a critical period of development or not at all.
      • Attachment plays a role in later development - the continuity hypothesis & monotropy.
    • Critical Period
      • If development does not take place during a set developmental period, then it may not take place at all.
      • Two and a half years.
    • Monotropy
      • The relationship with one special attachment figure.
      • Provides an infant with an internal working model of relationships.
        • Secure children develop a positive internal working model of themselves.
          • Based on their feelings of security derived from having one sensitive caregiver.
        • Avoidant children - Have an internal working model of unworthy.
          • Avoidant children are assumed to have a primary caregiver who is rejecting.
    • Summary
      • Bonds are formed with adults who respond most sensitively.
      • Bonds must occur during a critical period.
      • Infants are born with a drive to become attached.
      • Infants form one special relationship (monotropy).
    • Criticisms
      • Cannot know it is true, but are assuming it is likely.
      • Doesn't explain why some children can cope with poor attachment, while others suffer
    • Strenghts
      • Major theory of attachment.
      • Untitled
  • Three important features
    • Infants and carers are 'programmed to become attached.
    • As attachment is a biological process, it takes place during a critical period of development or not at all.
    • Attachment plays a role in later development - the continuity hypothesis & monotropy.
  • Secure children develop a positive internal working model of themselves.
    • Based on their feelings of security derived from having one sensitive caregiver.

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