THE FIRST FIVE YEAR PLAN 1928-1932

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  • The First Five Year Plan 1928-1932
    • When was it and what was it?
      • October 1928, although it wasn't officially recognised until April 1929, when the party adapted the 'optimal variant'.
        • It was a list of  economic goals set by Stalin based on his policy of 'Socialism in One Country'.
          • ECONOMIC: Solved the Scissors Crisis by improving industrial production. The use of targets to make projections of what they wanted to acheive long term helped.
    • Would Party Loyalists like it?
      • YES: It's more ideologically communist than the NEP. It solved the Scissors Crisis the NEP caused and improved heavy indstry, meaning Russia could defend itself if there was a foreign threat.
        • NO: It's not truly worker orientated.
      • NO: It's not truly worker orientated.
    • Why did it need to replace the NEP?
      • POLITICAL: It was a more socialist policy. Stalin was able to become the sole leader  of the party by eliminating Bukharin.
        • The GOSPLAN was the state planning committee that was responsible for central economic planning in the USSR.
          • ECONOMIC: Solved the Scissors Crisis by improving industrial production. The use of targets to make projections of what they wanted to acheive long term helped.
      • SOCIAL: Brought an end to NEPmen as well as bourgeoisie. (There can't be a 1% if everyone is poor).
        • NEPmen were capitalist business people in the early USSR who took advantage of the opportunities for private trade and small-scale manufacturing by the NEP.
        • QUICKSAND SOCIETY: The majority of new workers were peasants that had been forced off land collectivis-ation. They would wander for jobs; if they found a better job they would move on to it. Skilled workers competed for higher wages and moved easily betweeen jobs.
      • MILITARY: There was an emphasis on heavy industry as a result of the 1927 war scare and fear of foreign invasion, thus increasing the rate of arms manufactuing.
    • Would Workers like it?
      • NO: Unfair treatment at work. They were earning money but there were no consumer goods to spend it on. They were exploited, often damaging their bodies through excessive work.
        • YES: They had an incentive to work as they felt like they were personally helping their country and got rewarded with praise and fame for their contribution, such as Aleksei Stakhanov.
      • YES: They had an incentive to work as they felt like they were personally helping their country and got rewarded with praise and fame for their contribution, such as Aleksei Stakhanov.
    • SUCCESSES
      • Pioneers went into barren areas and set up new towns and industries from nothing.
        • For example: Magnitogorsk
      • Stakhanovites worked tirelessly for the regime's benefit.
      • Electricity production trebled.
      • Women were introduced to the work force (10 million).
      • Educations schemes were introduced to train people to be skilled and literate workers.
      • FAILURES
        • Thousands died from accidents, starvation or exposure to the cold.
        • Strikers were shot  and slow workers (wreckers) were imprisoned and/or executed.
        • Housing and wages were terrible and no consumer goods were produced for the people.
        • Many  workers were slaves and Kulaks from the Gulag.
        • A black market emerged.
    • FAILURES
      • Thousands died from accidents, starvation or exposure to the cold.
      • Strikers were shot  and slow workers (wreckers) were imprisoned and/or executed.
      • Housing and wages were terrible and no consumer goods were produced for the people.
      • Many  workers were slaves and Kulaks from the Gulag.
      • A black market emerged.
    • Stakhanovites were workers in the USSR who were exceptionally hard-working and productive. Named after Aleksei Stakhanov, who mined fourteen times his quota in less than six hours.
      • Would Workers like it?
        • NO: Unfair treatment at work. They were earning money but there were no consumer goods to spend it on. They were exploited, often damaging their bodies through excessive work.

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