The Tempest: Critics

  • Created by: Hannah274
  • Created on: 22-03-17 18:58
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  • The Tempest: Critics
    • Robert B. Pierce - 1999
      • "there is a re-birth, a return to life, a heightened, almost symbolic, awareness of the beauty of normal humanity”
        • LInk with a question about rebirth, the ways in which humanity is represented - 'oh brave new world.' Or it could be linked to where or not the island is a utopia or not.
    • Strehler and Simpson -  2002
      • "the real reveals itself false and where the false may and probably will reveal itself to be true"
        • 'The isle is full of noises' - the island  is completely  ethereal.
    • Meredith Anne Skura  - 1989
      • "Claims to the possession of the island are symptoms of  discourse"
        • Link to post-colonialism, and Freudian readings of the texts. Instead of the power struggle being purely literal some is due to unconscious desires.
    • Jan Fran Van Dijkhuizen - Prospero's dream
      • 'The masque celebrates Prospero's paternal magnanimity and his ability to defy the laws of time and nature'
        • Links with the psychological fatherhood reading as well as readings about his benevolence. It is truly real or is it just a ploy?
    • Anne Barton
      • 'The Tempest is an extraordinarily obliging piece of work.'
        • Good for a sentence starter, as it references the many ways in which The Tempest has been reimagined throughout the centuries.
    • Harold Brooks - 1978, The Tempest: What sort of play?
      • 'The play seems like a hall of mirrors'
        • Links to the many different parallels in the play. Could this then link to the comedic aspects of the play, a self satire of sorts? Or does it create a claustrophobic atmosphere where Prospero therefore can easily control all?
    • David Lindley - The Tempest, Cambridge University press
      • 'At the close of each act freedom and servitude are emphasised as central themes.'
        • Link with whether or not Prospero is benevolent or not. And the question of Caliban.
    • Lawrence Otto Goedde - 1989
      • The shipwreck is the 'surrender of self-control'
        • Psychological reading galore!! And also the fact that now Prospero has full control over the newcomers destiny - like Shakespeare himself.
      • 'The depictions  possess an internally consistent realism.'
        • Meaning that all those psychological readings are now rendered pointless!
    • Anne Richter
      • 'Mystery inventor and orchestrator of the plot'
        • Prospero: a well-intentioned father, or a tyrant. Links to the allegory that Shakespeare is Prospero, and the magic that comes along with it.
    • William Hazlitt - 1818
      • 'Caliban ...it strictly the legitimate sovereign of the isle, and Prospero and the rest are usurpers, who have outed him from his hereditary jurisdiction by the superiority of talent and knowledge.'
        • The tyrant of the island is Caliban. Romantic point of view, they were the first to see Caliban as the victim of Prospero's oppression.
    • Cedric Watts
      • 'In contrast to Prospero's vision of annihilating dissolution, Caliban evokes a sense of blissful interfusion.'
        • Supports Williams view that Caliban is the victim of European oppression.
    • Machiavelli
      • 'Never attempt to win by force what can be won by deception.'
        • The use of magic by Prospero is his main weapon against those that have usurped him. He uses his brains and not his force to trick those into submission.
    • J. Parsonage
      • 'Tyrant of the heart'.'
        • Political interpretation, the use of Miranda on the marriage market from Prospero to use for his own ends.
  • "Claims to the possession of the island are symptoms of  discourse"
    • Link to post-colonialism, and Freudian readings of the texts. Instead of the power struggle being purely literal some is due to unconscious desires.

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