Book 1: Storm and Banquet

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  • Storm and Banquet.
    • Introduction.
      • Invocation "tell me muse".
      • Aeneas and the fate/ destiny of Rome.
        • "this was the beginning of the Latin Race"
        • "this is the destiny the fates were unrolling"
        • Aeneas himself is not mentioned much. the Aenied is not about him but the fate of Rome and it's bright future.
        • essentially propaganda for the Roman Caesar (Augustus)
      • Juno's furor.
        • Carthage " the city she had long favoured, intending to give it sovereignty over the peoples of Earth"
    • The Storm.
      • Juno asks Aeolus to send the storm.
        • "overwhelm their ships and sink them"
        • Juno is worried about her authority.
          • "is there no one left to worship the godhead of Juno"
        • Aeolus.
          • He is offered a nymph who will "give you beautiful children"
            • Family relationships hold a lot of importance within the Aeneid.
          • he does so because he is grateful to her.
            • "my duty is to carry out your orders"
      • Hyperbole.
        • "blow a hurricane over the whole Earth"
        • "see the sea bed and seething sand"
        • "raising the waves to the stars"
      • Listing
        • the east wind and the south wind and the south west wind
        • Achates, then Abas and old Aletes succumbed to the storm"
          • emphasises how much Aeneas cares that he can name each man he sees.
      • other.
        • "men shouted, ropes screamed, clouds suddenly blotted out the light of the sky"
        • "black night brooded"
        • "he lifted his hands palms upwards towards the sky"
          • Aeneas genuinely beliveds he will die.
            • emphasises Juno's Furor.
      • Neptune's intervention.
        • "he recognised the anger of his cunning sister Juno"
        • "he is not the one who has jurisdiction over the sea and holds the trident that holds no pity"
        • before he had finished speaking he was calming the swell.
        • "as when disorder arises among the people of a great city and the common mob runs riot [...] a man who has some weight among them for his goodness and his services to the state, they fall silent, standing and listening with all their attention while his words command their passions and soothes their hearts"
          • Neptune represents Augustus.
            • Augustus was born Octavius on 23 September 63 BC. In 43 BC his great-uncle, Julius Caesar,, Octavius, , was named as his heir. In 31 BC defeated Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium.
          • clear propaganda
          • the first simile.
    • Carthage
      • initial impression.
        • "Rock cliffs are everywhere [...] a great pinnacle threatens the sky"
        • "a dark wood with quivering shadows, looming over the water"
        • "Amazed by the size of it"
          • ""the Tyrrians were working with will [...] they were like bees"
      • Dido
        • brave/ impressive
          • "the woman led the whole undertaking" (leaving her brothers land
        • "like Diana she bore herself joyfully among her people"
        • fair
          • "dividing the work that had to be done in equal parts"
        • Cautious
          • "it is a harsh necessity that forces me to make these precautions"
            • the Trojans werent allowed to dock
        • generous
          • "you shall have my protection"
          • offers to search for Aeneas.
          • "through my own sufferings I am learning to help those who suffer"
        • "Doomed Dido"
          • Untitled
      • "their walls are already rising!"
      • " a race glorious in war"
    • Venus and Jupiter.
      • Venus
        • childish
          • "her shining eyes brimming with tears"
          • "did you not promise[?]"
        • "my son Aeneas"
        • manipulating
          • "your own children [...] we lose our ships [..] we are betrayed"
      • Jupiter
        • assuring
          • "you can be sure that the destiny of your descendants remains unchanged"
        • fatherly
          • "looking at his daughter with a smile that clears the sky and dispels the storms"
        • poweful
          • "no argument changes my mind"
        • regal
          • he is above the fighting and manipulation in this instance
        • he sends down Mercury to make Carthage hospitable
      • Juno
        • "because there is one who hates us"
      • Jupiter discusses the fate of Rome setting up the major theme of the epic
    • Venus and Aeneas.
      • she id disguised as a Spartan girl  looking for her sister.
        • bow hanging from her shoulder, lose hair, dress to the knee, purple boots
      • the don't have that close of a relationship.
        • Aeneas recognises that she is a goddess but not who.
        • "why am i never allowed to take your hand in mine"
      • she tells Aeneas of the story of Dido and gives him advice.
      • Venus does care about her son
        • the don't have that close of a relationship.
          • Aeneas recognises that she is a goddess but not who.
          • "why am i never allowed to take your hand in mine"
        • "I do not believe you are hated by the gods"
    • Aeneas' character.
      • resourceful
        • "he succeeded in stretching 7 huge carcases on the ground"
      • a leader
        • "he showed them the face of hope and kept his misery deep in his heart"
        • he knows the names of all his men
      • pious
        • "a man famous for his piety"
          • first thing we hear about Aeneas.
      • helpless
        • fate. he cannot control any actions, everything is already set out.
      • "dutiful Aeneas"
      • intelligent
        • "surely you must be a goddess?"
      • loving father
        • "a fathers love allowed him no rest" (he sends for Ascinus)
    • Temple of Juno/ depiction of the Trojan war
      • the depiction shoes: Priam, Achillies, Diomede, Trolius, Trojan women, Athene, Hector, the Amazons and Aeneas
      • "groaning, rivers of tears washed down his cheeks"
        • this is physically painful for Aeneas
      • when the women were makiing themselves supplicants Athene " turned from them and her eyes were fixed upon the ground"
        • the goddess cant stand to be a witness to their pain. she doesn't enjoy inflicting violence.
      • "selling his dead body for gold"
        • the Greeks are made out as savages with no remorse

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