Stereotyping, Prejudice and Discrimination

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination
    • Research into stereotyping
      • Stereotype
        • An oversimplified, generalised set of ideas that we have about others
      • Rubin
        • Parents were asked to describe their babies within 24 hours of them being born
        • They found that parents of baby boys described their babies as being alert and strong
          • The baby girls were described as  soft and delicate
        • Parents stereotype their children from a very early stage despite no stereotypical behaviour being shown
          • This can start before the baby is born i.e painting their room blue for a boy and pink for a girl
        • Practical implications
          • Increased awareness that children observe and imitate those around them
    • Prejudice
      • A rigid set of attitudes or beliefs towards particular groups of people.
      • Barret + Short
        • Interviewed 216 English children aged between 5-10, on their views and opinions of people  from different European countries
        • At this age children  already demonstrated more positive views to  some groups than to others
          • French were liked most
          • German's liked least
        • By the age of 10 children already hold prejudiced views towards other nationalities
    • Discrimination
      • The way  an individual behaves towards another person or group as a result of their prejudiced view
    • Authoritarian personality
      • A personality type that is prone to being prejudiced
      • F-scale
        • The questionnaire used by Adorno to measure personality characteristics
      • Adorno
        • Hundreds of people were interviewed and tested using the F-scale
        • They found a  relationship between personality traits and prejudiced views
        • There is an authoritarian personality  and people with these characteristics are highly likely to  be prejudiced towards others
        • Evaluation
          • The theory  doesn't explain why people are prejudiced towards one group but not others
          • It is difficult  to provide evidenceto support the idea that parenting style contributes to an authoritarian personality
          • There are some prejudiced people in the world who didn't grow up with strict  and critical parents
            • And vice versa
          • The statements were easier to agree with than to disagree with
          • Research done in America
            • Can't be generalised to whole world
          • Adorno only found a correlation between  personality type and prejudice
    • Robbers Cave Experiment
      • Sherif
        • An American summer camp was organised for 22 boys. they were randomly split into 2 teams and kept away from each other.
          • They were not aware that the other camp existed
          • After a while the two groups were allowed to find one another and the camp staff introduced a series of competitions with  a prize for the winning team
        • Very quickly, the teams began unpleasant name-calling towards each other and tried to attack each other
        • Competition is a cause of prejudice
        • Evaluation
          • The groups and competitions were artificial so don't necessarily reflect real life
          • He used 12 year old, white, middle-class boys
            • Can't be generalised
              • The boys were all American
          • The boys were all American
          • It has real- life implications
            • Clearly demonstrated how quickly prejudice can arise between  groups if they are competing for the same thing
          • It showed how quickly  people can form alliances with others when they feel that they have something in common
    • How to reduce prejudice and discrimination
      • Jigsaw method
        • The name gven to the technique used by Aronson to reduce prejudice within a group of mixed-race students
      • Harwood
        • Karwood asked children and their grandparents about  their relationships. Th echildren were also asked about their views of the elderly in general
        • Children who had regular contact with  grandparents held positive views towards the elderly
        • Contact with grandparents is a good predictor of a child's attitude towards the elderly
        • Evaluation
          • Information gathered  from interviews is not always reliable
          • There are children who don't have regular contact  with grandparents but still have positive attitudes towards the elderly
        • Practical implications
          • Illustrates the importance of regular contact between children and grandparents

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Stereotyping, discrimination and prejudice resources »