Southern Blacks in Late 1945

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Southern Blacks in Late 1945
    • Political Rights
      • There were not voting rights for all
      • Number of registered black voters was creeping up.
      • Registering to Vote
        • White registrars made it difficult and almost impossible for Blacks to register.
        • In Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks finally registered to vote in 1945
          • Previous attempts were unsuccessful.
            • White registrar claimed she 'failed' the literacy test.
      • The South, with a high proportion of Blacks in its population, was represented by Whites.
    • Employment
      • Majority of Blacks had the most low-paid, menial jobs, partly because of their poor education in inferior, segregated schools, and partly because of discrimination.
        • Black women - worked in domestic service, cleaning, cooking, and childminding for White families.
        • Black men worked in hotels as bellhops, or collected city garbage.
        • Blacks education and colour trapped many Southern Blacks in jobs that wasted their potential.
      • Black soldiers found it very difficult to find jobs when returning back home due to the lack of job vacancies or respect and gratitude for their service.
      • War demonstrated how Whites disliked working alongside Blacks.
      • Untitled
    • Segregation in daily life
      • Would frequently face reminders of their legally enshrined social inequality
        • 1945 - young MLK had just emerged from an inferior, segregated school in Atlanta, Georgia.
          • MLK and his father were unable to sit alongside white people in Southern restaurants, cinemas or public transport.
  • Legal position
    • Southern Blacks in Late 1945
      • Political Rights
        • There were not voting rights for all
        • Number of registered black voters was creeping up.
        • Registering to Vote
          • White registrars made it difficult and almost impossible for Blacks to register.
          • In Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks finally registered to vote in 1945
            • Previous attempts were unsuccessful.
              • White registrar claimed she 'failed' the literacy test.
        • The South, with a high proportion of Blacks in its population, was represented by Whites.
      • Employment
        • Majority of Blacks had the most low-paid, menial jobs, partly because of their poor education in inferior, segregated schools, and partly because of discrimination.
          • Black women - worked in domestic service, cleaning, cooking, and childminding for White families.
          • Black men worked in hotels as bellhops, or collected city garbage.
          • Blacks education and colour trapped many Southern Blacks in jobs that wasted their potential.
        • Black soldiers found it very difficult to find jobs when returning back home due to the lack of job vacancies or respect and gratitude for their service.
        • War demonstrated how Whites disliked working alongside Blacks.
        • Untitled
      • Segregation in daily life
        • Would frequently face reminders of their legally enshrined social inequality
          • 1945 - young MLK had just emerged from an inferior, segregated school in Atlanta, Georgia.
            • MLK and his father were unable to sit alongside white people in Southern restaurants, cinemas or public transport.
    • Not protected by the Law
      • Southern state laws made it difficult for Blacks to vote.
      • Legally separate from Whites in public places
        • Schools, Cafeterias, libraries, parks, beaches, buses and theatres.
      • Judges, jurors, and LEO's were all white.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Civil Rights in the USA 1945-1968 resources »